Resident feedback re OCP submitted to council spring 2013

Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA)
January 17, 2013 meeting questionnaire
Survey responses

The January 17, 2013 meeting hosted by MCCA was well attended, and it is very clear residents want to be informed and to be heard. Geoff Scott of Tri-CitiesTV recorded the event (available on DVD).

The focus of the meeting was to provide a forum for Moody Centre residents to interact with Port Moody city council and key staff regarding the draft Official Community Plan (“OCP”) that was made public in late 2012.
An MCCA Bulletin prepared and distributed in advance of the meeting contained seven survey questions.

1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
4. Additional comments?
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?

For question 1, “What do you see as positive impacts, if any?”, the most common response was “none.”

Most people express concern about the proposed changes to Moody Centre, and cite a number of reasons. There are recurrent themes, as can be seen in the sample comments below. The vast majority feel the draft OCP does not represent their values or deal with their current concerns, and ignores previous input provided to council.

MCCA received some comments that were not in the survey format. They are included in this document. (Some feedback sent directly to the city was also provided to MCCA, so may not be repeated here.)

Miscellaneous feedback follows the survey responses section. A DVD from the January 17, 2013 information meeting, along with original copies of 2 petitions, will be given to the city separately.
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Hi,
I regret the fact that because of my planned trip out of the province, I will not be able to attend the proposed meeting on January 17th.
My wife and I would like to register our objection in principle to the latest draft of Port Moody`s Official Community Plan.
Listed below are our comments in order of appearance in the feedback form:
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
NONE
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
We agree with everything that is listed in the information brochure. Very well documented, we might add.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
NONE
4. Additional comments?
The area is already congested with too many cars and people.
There is no justification for building more highrise multiple dwellings when there is already high vacancy rates in Moody Centre.
It will lower our property value significantly within a very short time frame, 1-2 years.
Increased population density will lead to increased crime and lower the quality of life in the neighbourhood.

6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
We have lived in the Port Moody Centre Community for the last 4.5 years.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
We were attracted to live in Moody Centre for the natural beauty and lower population density compared with the Vancouver downtown core.
B.
P.S.
Please inform us when the proposal will be debated in the Port Moody City Council for a vote.
We thank you very much for informing us about this quiet recent development.
Follow-up response
Thank you so much for your prompt response.
I did not have a foggiest idea about what is happening in this regard.
Now that it is on my radar with your hard work, I will do everything to prevent the proposed Official Community Plan from passing the city council. When I write to the city, I will make sure you receive a copy.
My nearest intersection is Klahanie and Murray.
You may count on my full support in opposing the proposed OCP.
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Good afternoon,
Thank you for bringing to my attention the proposed official community plan (OCP) through the delivered Moody Centre Bulletin.
Unfortunately I am not able to attend the meeting on Jan17th. That is why I am emailing you my feedback about the latest draft of Port Moody’s Official Community Plan and hoping that my opinion could be counted among the ones that would like to preserve our neighbourhood as it is.
Regarding Moody Centre Community Feedback, here are my answers:
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Unfortunately nothing.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
– Adding cosmopolitan buildings will destroy the heritage character of Moody Centre. Let’s not damage Port Moody Centre as they did with New Westminster’s Centre (Columbia St).
– No more privacy when so taller buildings (20 storeys or over) are watching single-family heritage houses for which our neighbourhood is so well known and famous.
– A significant increase on traffic will make the streets of Port Moody congested more then they are now, especially at the rush hours, transforming them on a giant parking lot with high carbon emission level. Not to mention the increase of the parking issues.
– A significant impact on property values and taxes
– A crowded park space where instead of relaxing your eyes with nature and green your retina will be scratched by the view of metal skeletons and glass.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Only concerns are applying to me personally and they are mentioned above.
4. Additional comments?
This is worse than HST after an election. I strongly support to have a local referendum before council approves it or not.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
6 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Albert & Hope St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
It is a small neighborhood with charming houses. It is like an oasis surrounded by water and greens (Chines). It is almost pristine place nowadays, in comparison with most of our neighboring cities, that has not been touched by “civilisation” and I really want to be kept this way.
Thank you,
V.
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1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
I see NO positive impacts.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
I think there will be negative impacts on traffic, parking and views. We don’t have the amenities or space to support this increase in population.
4. Additional comments?
If towers are allowed it will ruin the whole atmosphere and heritage of Moody Centre and this can’t be undone.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
I’ve lived in Port Moody 24 years.
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
The nearest intersection to my address is Williams & St. George Street.
C.
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I hope you are doing well. I’ve received your MCCA brochure and will be filling it out. Thanks for this.
I have also read in the Tri-City News about a new group called the “West Port Moody Property Owners Group”. Do you have a contact email for them? I would very much like to better understand their stance on this.
Thanks so much,
D.
Follow-up
Hi there.
Rather than printing and scanning for email the feedback form on the back of the document “Attention – All Moody Centre Residents”, I have just replicated the form herein with my comments.
Thanks very much for putting out this newsletter for information of residents in this area. It is useful to understand all sides of the argument. Unfortunately, this is not a helpful document to residents of the area, as it clearly agenda driven and does not accurately represent facts without bias. It is troubling that a group that may have some valid concerns regarding the OCP and densification of the area, can so easily discredit themselves with a document that does not actually offer an alternative solution or creative discussion on how change CAN be accommodated in Port Moody in a constructive way. This is not a solution driven argument, but a NIMBY argument that assumes a static environment in a dynamic urban region.
This said, some of your commentary has merit, and I will share that in my response, but the fear-mongering approach is unacceptable in a quest for consensus and solutions and only discredits your organisation.
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
The proposed OCP amendments, as shown by Port Moody, and not fully represented in this document call for a transition of the Port Moody centre area from sleepy suburban byway to a dynamic destination and diversity of uses that will create value and amenity for the community. Currently, St. Johns street is a relic of ad-hoc development through the 60’s and 80’s more than being representative of “heritage”. Indeed, the best heritage preservation has been done by individuals seeking to densify and infill lots in the Port Moody centre by co-location of heritage buildings in return for increased density. Stasis is not a synonym for preservation. I think the OCP land use review is a generally thoughtful consideration of core areas along St. Johns, identification of key nodes and transit stations, and consideration of solar access given the steepness of the Chineside Ravines to the south of the community.
Of particular importance to Port Moody, as noted in your document, is the ‘gateway’ site. This is indeed a site that needs to see density. Architecturally, it marks the entry to what I believe is the most beautiful city in the Lower Mainland and should be a sensitive piece of architecture that welcomes this arrival. This is a large site that can likely accomodate a modified tower form or a terracing slab building of up to 12 stories set back from the street or podium buildings below. The street frontages on Clarke needs to be dynamic and interactive with the street. Ideally this would be a commercial or retail element on Clarke wrapping the corner that provides a hub of activity. In the absence of this being a viable commercial site (it may not be the best site given access and the slope of the hill), we certainly need to see a strong 3 level streetwall with doors on the street much like you see along Richards Street in Vancouver or the newer (last phase) ground oriented homes in Newport at the entrance to Newport Road off Ungless. This will both civilise and animate the street. If there is not be a retail corner on Clarke and Albert, the buildings could actually step back to frame a corner plaza that is welcoming and provides a place for students to congregate as they wait for the bus and/or wait to cross the street. Currently this is a very tight environment and unsafe for the students choosing to walk or bus to school, something we wish to encourage. So some area of respite on this corner would be suitable. This is a large site, so I believe there is room to let the site ‘breathe’ on the Albert Street frontage with a more generous setback and perhaps a public space that leads to the corner. An excellent Port Moody example is Polygon’s project on Klahanie Drive between the clubhouse and Nootka, where the there is a large public setback from the street used by the community and has setback townhome frontages below the tower. It is a wonderful space and would serve Albert Street, the students, and the residents well.
Bringing density between Queens Street and Buller Street is very appropriate to the scale shown and is already being witnessed by “the Station” development, which is already adding an attractive frontage to the north side of St. Johns. This scale is very European and can be done very well. Urban designers and architects have learned alot about how to handle how a mid-rise building meets the street in a friendly and civilised manner that animates the street and provides enough density and value to support retail and commercial services. Indeed, the south side of St. Johns in this core area would benefit greatly from a local-sized grocer like Thrifty’s, Nesters, or IGA and would support local living and reduced emissions with shorter vehicle distances to shopping and incentivise and improve the comfort of walking along St. Johns. Redevelopment of St. Johns will enable wider sidewalks setback from the street with boulevards and street trees. Currently it is an uncomfortable environment of parking lot frontage strip malls – a vestige of the 70’s and 80’s – and homes that for the most part (with some glowing heritage exceptions) are run-down rental or holding properties. 6 storeys is a wonderful scale for St. Johns, particularly if developers and planners can work together to figure out Spring Street and the unusual block depth it provides.
I think it is important to note that any project along St. Johns would require a rezoning and most folks that happily live their day-to-day don’t know what that entails. Your brochure makes it seems like a rezoning assumes mega-development of the full block without providing the opportunities that rezoning creates under the Local Government Act, which you reference to your convenience. Without rezoning, we are not closing the door to redevelopment. Under outright zoning, we are exposed to the redevelopment of the same poor form of development that already plagues Port Moody Centre. It is not this heritage paradise that you envision. Look at the Shoppers Drug Mart and parking lot we got stuck with on Moray and St. Johns. While the store is an asset to those of us in Port Moody Centre, this would have been a much better environment had it been a part of a mixed-use development between Moray and Clearview that provided a coherent and pedestrian-oriented street frontage with Shoppers being one of those amenities. Now we are stuck with this parking lot as a frontage for some time. Rezoning will ALLOW the preservation of key heritage buildings and their incorporation into the project or movement to a more appropriate site (see the Soofi project on St. George). Rezoning is DISCRETIONARY and is a negotiation between the City and the developer AND the public, as every zoning is required to have a public process. Rezoning can be used to create open space, to provide children’s play, to ensure the provision of public greenways and other amenities, etc. It does not assume full development right and can be used wisely by municipalities and Port Moody has proven to have done so in the past.
Again, in regard to scale, I think that up to 12 storeys ‘could’ be supportable for the waterfront village, but this would be subject to a comprehensive site design and rezoning. I think that 12 storey elements could be included with careful regard to view corridors and the other proposed 6 storey developments that will be relying on this view as visual amenity for those choosing to live in higher density developments on St. Johns and Clarke Street. Again, nothing is done in isolation and heights are not universal at an OCP level. The waterfront village would need to be fully rezoned AND subdivided prior to any development. In order to do this, a comprehensive and public-involved masterplan would need to be developed. It would be the right of the City to require view studies, shadow studies, transportation and access studies, etc as a part of completing this zoning. Your concerns are too broad-reaching to address the realities of actual development and the municipal process. An ODP amendment is a ‘framework’ for future rezonings, but does not define land use as a rezoning does.
I am a huge supporter of TOD’s, and just because a term has “not been used in previous drafts” does not mean that the term cannot be included in current drafts. TOD’s are a proven way to add both value and amenity to a community and significantly reduce car ownership and GHG emissions in a community, while supporting affordability with reduced parking requirements. Folks living near transit walk more, take transit more, own less cars, and shop locally. There is no argument to the value they provide. That said, I do AGREE with you that 20 storeys may be a bit out-of-place in this core node. I will address this in question #2.
Overall, I think the proposed OCP is a significant benefit to Port Moody, will continue to showcase Port Moody as a leader in sensitive and smart urbanisation and will provide opportunities for community amenity that we would otherwise never have.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
I think there are 2 impacts of a negative nature in the proposed OCP and 1 negative impact that is not really a subject of the OCP, therefore I will start with that.
I think it is an unfortunate misstep of TransLink to not fund the 3rd Evergreen Station near Barnet Highway. With the future development of the Waterfront Village and the location of Moody Secondary, there will be strong demands for transit on the west end of Port Moody. Currently students line-up often 2 or 3 bus-loads deep waiting for the 97B in either direction. I fear that without this station and reduced bus service along St. Johns, students and future residents at the western end will revert to driving. However, I do think that densification of the Gateway site, the Soofi ‘hotel’ site and the Waterfront Village may provide the contribution dollars that a private/public partnership could fund a station, much as Coquitlam has done. So, while a negative, we could turn this into a positive and asset driver.
I agree that 20 storeys between Moody and Electronic on the north side of St Johns may be excessive. I do see this area ‘rising’ from the 6 storeys proposed on the east and the west, but not to the extent of 20 storeys. Height of this level does not occur until the Ioco area and would be out of context. I would see the site transitioning from 6 storey to 8 storeys to perhaps 12 storeys near Williams. This would be a nice general rise to mark the transit heart of the community and would support more street-wall style buildings rather than point towers, which would be out of context on these longer urban-style blocks. I would also worry about shadowing to sites on Murray Street, particularly those of heritage asset on the north side of Murray. Murray is a unique area that could achieve some densification, but should be treated as a character area, so it would be important to respect the impact of tower to the south on St. Johns. 12 storeys, sensitively designed would mitigate this and not be a significant loss of density to 20 storeys, as proposed.
Much like my comments above, the triangle site north of the Klahanie Development and south of the Golden Spike might be the location for 20 storey towers, but 30 may be excessive given access to that triangle and adjacencies. I would think that a couple of twenty storey towers could be carefully sited to take advantage of wonderful views between the two Klahanie towers without impacting privacy or shade the Klahanie neighbourhood. The Klahanie towers are greater than 20 storeys, but are lower than this triangle site. Geography and topography alone would have these triangle site towers read higher than 20 storeys from the waterfront regardless and given their location are not ‘iconic’ towers for Port Moody, but are more comfortable as background urban fabric. This would then support the step “up” in both height and topography to the Ioco corner site at 30 storeys. Again, creating a nice transition to a very accessible and high density (appropriately) corner.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
I have noted many of the benefits in #1, above. But, when addressed personally, these are the key benefits of this OCP amendment:
– Creation of a vibrant and walkable St. Johns street with a comfortable mixed-use street wall, generous sidewalks, and street trees and boulevard plantings
– Better and safer pedestrian connections along St. Johns to Ioco and the Red Bridge
– Increased density will support increased retail and commercial amenity, leading to walkable access to groceries, services, etc.
– Increased overall value in the Port Moody centre due to co-location with a bustling and modern urban waterfront community
– Opportunities (if rezoning appropriately) for more open space and parkettes along St. Johns, Clarke/Murray, and Spring to take advantage of the sunny flatter nature of of the St. Johns corridor – not just mass densification but the extraction of a network of neighbourhood scale public green spaces to add park-amenity to our community at a scale that is not the same as Rocky Point park
The negative impacts that would affect me personally by this OCP amendment would be:
– some additional traffic load, but given that our future destinations will be more walkable, I think the trade-off is high value
– the lack of a transit station on the west side
4. Additional comments?
I have been pretty thorough thus far. My only further comment is the comparison to Burke Mountain. Originally, the goal of Burke was a smaller footprint with a rather dense core modelled on Newport Village as a key example. Through successive councils and the sway of developers, density has been significantly reduced, no longer supporting the amenity that was dreamed of. The village will now feature a 7-11 and a hair styling salon and bank – hardly the commercial core envisioned. Forest has been removed to make way for privatised greenspace beholden to single family home owners, rather than density allowing the preservation of greenspace and forest for the public, while creating a completely auto-dependent community. I think using Burke Mountain as a “positive” comparison is misguided and completely inappropriate for Port Moody. I would be embarrassed to use the current approval program for Burke Mountain as a model for any kind of sensitive development.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
9 years.
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
St. George and Douglas.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
After moving to the Lower Mainland 20 years ago, we settled in the Tri-Cities and had lived in Coquitlam, Port Moody, and Port Coquitlam. After our short rental stay in Port Moody, we had always longed to either move to the Port Moody Centre area with the hopes of what it could be, or the North Burnaby area long Hastings street, which is already undergoing some of the changes we envision for Port Moody Centre. At the end of the day, Port Moody centre was the obvious choice due to access to mountain biking, hiking, water sports in the inlet, great community services, and the opportunities to be part of a great renaissance for Port Moody centre. This OCP will help frame that renaissance and make it a place that is modern, yet embraces it’s roots, and celebrates the future with new amenities, new excitement, and new opportunties, thereby increasing liveability for all residents of the area.
Regards,
D.
Follow-up 2
My apologies on the last email, as I forgot one critical element of support for your concerns.
I think that any densification and OCP amendment has to be back-stopped (as you note) by a thorough review and oversite on:
1. What necessary infrastructure upgrades are required
2. A comprehensive city-wide traffic and access (including safety and emergency vehicles) review
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Potential burden any upgrades will be on the current population versus deferral to the future population that is necessitating infrastructure upgrades
4. Additional comments?
Overall parks and open space plan to inform future rezonings, so it is not ad-hoc and piecemeal negotiation with each developer including a total Park space per person review
5. Overall amenities plan that is population driven and triggered to ensure that new developments are supporting additional community and service infrastructure (libraries, recreation/community centres, etc)
If the City is not able to put provide or undertake this kind of advance research at the city-scale than any OCP revision is inappropriate at this time. The City must first substantiate what load can be supported and then how this additional residential load will contribute the services and demands they will add on the municipal infrastructure PRIOR to the adoption of any revised OCP.
In this, I do strongly agree with the MCCA and without this in place, I would be hesitant to support formal adoption of the OCP amendment proposals at this time.
And MCCA, if my tone in the first email was brusque, my apologies. I am always concerned when one group that is not necessarily representative of the whole presents information without clearly stating their bias upfront. I certainly support your right to have a strong opinion and commend you for your use of democracy and a voice. Too many are too silent on issues and it’s folks like your organisation that certainly make sure people like me are also awake to what is happening and forcing us to have a good hard think!
Regards and with thanks,
D.
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1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
More businesses along St. John’s that would cater to the needs of Moody Centre residents.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
TRAFFIC. Clarke, St. Johns and St. George Streets are already congested during rush hour. Our roads can not accommodate more traffic.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
All I care about is traffic calming Moody Centre! AND, I also don’t want to see the same thing happen to Moody centre that’s happened to New West – houses sandwiched in by apartments and highrises.
4. Additional comments?
I have a gut feeling that the only way Moody Centre will be traffic calmed, and this issue taken seriously by city council, is when one of our neighbourhood kids gets killed by a “rat runner” in our neighbourhood during rush hour. This proposed development without infrastructure will force us to move.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
12 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Elgin and St. George St
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Heritage homes and people around us that take pride in owning heritage homes.
K.
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Hi,
I just received the flyer about the Proposed OCP Land use. I wish I was able to come to the meeting, but I am out of town. The flyer that was sent was very well done, and basically I agree with everything mentioned as I against these type of developments. Here are some of the reasons why:
1) Developments like the one proposed is high in cost that will be put onto the burden of the residents of port moody. In the end property taxes will have to be increased as you mentioned in the flyer.
2) Many condo units sit empty in already developments already in Port Moody, and other areas of the Tri-cities. Should we not have these filled first.
3) Traffic Issues, St Johns is already congested there is absolutely no way we can handle much more traffic. The evergreen line will barely alleviate the traffic that already exist as the train only goes to loughheed station. This does not change the habits of drivers, it only changes the transit system where there would be less need for buses.
4) Condo prices are on the drop, adding any more supply could damage all value for condos. The natural progression is people buy condos then start a family and try to purchase a house. After children move on move back to a condo. Families do not want to leave in condos
5) High Rises attract crime when they allow renters. The price of new condos are quite high, and most average people cannot afford them. A lot of them are purchased from crime money as ‘renting’ out condos is a easy way to laundry money.
Just some stuff I feel, Can you please keep me updated on any developments on this.
Thanks,
S.
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1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
None – It promotes Port Moody as a commuter community. What happened to the Center of the Arts and Preservation of the City’s heritage?
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
It promotes Port Moody as a commuter community. It corrodes our Center of the Arts theme and does not preserve the City’s heritage. It results in more traffic congestion. Port Moody already has poor air quality and this would further add to the air pollution. It also restricts my view thus reducing the value of my property.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
NONE!!!!
4. Additional comments?
What are the drivers of this rezoning proposal and which Council members favor this???
Is this driven by GVRD’s commitment to Rapid Transit, if so why was it not presented when such discussions took place. Can Rapid Transit be reviewed?
What can we do to stop this and how can I help?
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
15 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Gatensbury and Noble Court
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
It was a small relatively low density population community with a commitment to its heritage and aspirations to be a center for the arts.
T.
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Hello,
I’m sorry to have missed the event last night and want to extend my support of the MCCA.
I am a 4-year resident of Klahanie. I am both concerned and excited about the evolution of moody centre. As a mother of two young children, my concerns centre around the schools in moody centre and the safety considerations with the introduction of the evergreen line.
• I would like to see moody elementary relocated to the moody middle site to create distance from the skytrain station and to accomodate the increase in population.
• I would like to see investment in the schools in moody centre with respect to facilities and programs of choice (IB, French, Montessori, Reggio) extending the appeal of the IB program at Moody Secondary and attracting students to the area (I am aware of the Moody Middle rebuild and support this initiative).
• I would like to see an increase in playground facilities in moody centre. The equipment at rocky point park is not enough to support the increase of families and children in the area. Currently, Klahanie has a small playground (2-8 children) funded by one of the 12 stratas. Suterbrook has no playground facility.
• I would like to see an increase in law enforcement officers and a plan for patrol by transit police for the streets within a 5km radius of each station
In general, I would like to see the city and the school district offer more amenities to the community in moody centre as it grows and evolves. Density brings about change in populations, new needs, new demands, and a requirement for increased services.
Sincerely,
K.
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HI thank you for putting together the meeting last night. How late were you there? I left after 8:30pm.
I am new to Port Moody and although I am on the CITY’s email list I did not know about this meeting. I read it in the Tri City News.
We have a lovely view from our bedroom (I live at Elgin and St John’s) north facing. Although I am not opposed to development I certainly am not in favor of 20 storey buildings. I added my personal email to your list last night and I hope to continue to communicate with you.
I also read there was another group of spearheaded by Jillian Hull – are you familiar with her? What is her take on this? Also do you have the larger map you could send me via email?
I have the rendering sketch but not the larger one that was shown on the lap top last night. Thank you for your time. I would like to get up to speed on this – the sooner the better.
Thanks again!
C.
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Thank you so much for your informative newsletter about the OCP – thank goodness it caught my eye and I had a moment to read it. I’m absolutely outraged by the points you have highlighted and attach my comments, not only to your questions on the back, but throughout. I see that one of my comments beside the zoning section was cut off on the attached – it was OMG!
We fully expected to see more development with the advent of the Evergreen line, but I can’t believe anyone would even suggest 20 storey buildings along St. Johns/Clarke. I don’t even see value in the Evergreen line – 3 trains to get downtown, when I can drive there in 25 minutes is not the right solution for Port Moody, but what’s done is done on that issue.
Unfortunately, I don’t see myself able to attend your meeting tonight but you would be welcome to quote any of my comments, and if I can offer any further support by way of a letter, or the like, please let me know. Based on availability I would also be willing to meet with PoMo’s Mayor and/or other officials.
Good luck tonight!
P.
Survey response:
How dare they propose more growth without dealing with these issues!
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
NONE.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Destroying our waterfront; overpopulation for infrastructure; Murray St. bridge should have been replaced years ago – are we waiting for deaths? Let’s concentrate on the size of city we have now and work on improving it.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
We moved to PoMo 30 years ago because of the mountains, the Burrard Inlet, Rocky Point Park, etc. – let’s not ruin it. We’ll probably move! I see no benefit to 20 storey buildings. We pay enough taxes to maintain what we have; we don’t need to draw more people to Moody Centre.
4. Additional comments?
I’m not against development; by all means turn our waterfront into a destination like Steveston, Granville Island and the like with restaurants, shops, etc., and low-rises south of the waterfront where it makes sense.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
30 years.
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
St. John’s and Moody. Yes, we’re affected by the new building there – we can’t allow anything higher than that!!
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
See above, and add small town feel, yet only 30 minute drive from downtown Vancouver.
Follow-up
I am fine with you using my name as I feel quite strongly about this, but of course this is a personal matter, and so my company name should not be used.
I have a colleague here, however, who is also a Port Moody resident and agrees with my concerns over the proposed OCP. I have copied him here to lend his support.
Cheers,
P.
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As P has indicated, she and I work together and are both residents of Port Moody. For reference, my address is XXX in Port Moody.
P and I discussed our views on the proposal and in short agree on the issues that P has raised. Both P and I are supportive of development within Port Moody and in the region in question, but are not supportive of some of the proposed strategies. As well, I am also concerned that it doesn’t appear that prior community feedback collected by the city on development is this area has not been carried forward. As a result, this starts to feel like … keep throwing stuff at the community, get them numbed to the issues, then push through whatever someone wants.
Port Moody is a special community … that’s why we moved here. We can enhance the community for sure, but some of these plans are frankly “throwing the baby out with the bath water”.
As P has indicated, these are our personal views and not the views of the organization that we happen to work for.
Thanks and good luck with the meeting tonight.
B.
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Thank you very much for the MCCA meeting.
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Not any positive impacts can be seen except more property tax can be collected by city.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Ruin the “City of the Arts”. More traffic ,more people, more criminal will be here. I don’t want to see Port Moody being changed to Burnaby or Richmond.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
The house (apt) price will be higher and higher, everywhere will be crowd and noise.
4. Additional comments?
Port Moody is the only city with no indoor swimming pool. What is the purpose for the city to build so many high rise and bring in so many people? Do we have this obligation?
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
I have been living here for 8 years and like it very much. I don’t want to see any big change here. Don’t change our beautiful “small town “please !
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
ST George St. and ST John St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Beautiful natural environment, convenient communications, large lot and nice neighbours.
Best Regards,
T.
****************
Moody Centre Community Feedback

Latest draft of Port Moody’s Official Community Plan
January 2013
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
None – It promotes Port Moody as a commuter community. What happened to the Center of the Arts and Preservation of the City’s heritage?
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
It promotes Port Moody as a commuter community. It corrodes our Center of the Arts theme and does not preserve the City’s heritage. It results in more traffic congestion. Port Moody already has poor air quality and this would further add to the air pollution. It also restricts my view thus reducing the value of my property.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
NONE!!!!
4. Additional comments?
What are the drivers of this rezoning proposal and which Council members favor this???
Is this driven by GVRD’s commitment to Rapid Transit, if so why was it not presented when such discussions took place. Can Rapid Transit be reviewed?
What can we do to stop this and how can I help?
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
15 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Gatensbury and Noble Court
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
It was a small relatively low density population community with a commitment to its heritage and aspirations to be a center for the arts.
S.
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I was unable to attend the information meeting on January 17th at the Port Moody Legion Hall, but I would like to present my comments in the Moody Centre Community Feedback, as follows:
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
At this time, I see no positive impact at all. I am not against progress, but right now, Port Moody can not absorb the changes proposed without seriously affecting the quality of life for current and future residents.
2. What do you see as the negative impacts?
Even with the “configuration” changes to streets and land use, our public resources would be taxed. Our green space is limited with our current population, more people would mean even less green space. Parking is limited, St. John street traffic in rush hous is bumper to bumper now. Unless and until traffic funnelling through Port Moody to Pitt Meadows and beyond is rerouted, the congestion will be so much worse with denser population. More pollution, more stress on public facilities, crime. Every impact that more population, lin not enough space brings.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
The biggest concern to me personally is that my property value will go down and also, this beautiful town will become just another place to put people ,with no room to build and develop infrastructure to support so many additional people, or provide more and improved amenities that should grow with the growth in population. I forsee a ghetto. We are unique in that our town is small and that should be a huge consideration for growth.
4. Additional Comments:
Port Moody is currently a desirable area in which to live partly because of the beautiful view of the inlet and mountains, the access to Vancouver by the wonderful Barnet Highway. Our Marina’s and beaches are clean and accessible: 20,000 more people would jeopardize our natural resources.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
8 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Williams Street and St. John Street
7. Why were you attracted to Port Moody
The fact that it has a special feeling of being a suburb with a strong community feeling. There is an even mix of single family housing and condos which provides an inclusive feeling for all residents. It’s a small town with a lot of style and heart and It felt like a jewel to me.
M.
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I was at the meeting at the Legion the other night, and was hoping to be a the meeting tonight at City Hall, But I am not feeling well, I did want to tell you that I talked to a friend in North Vancouver who had a similar problem by Marine Dr by Capilano Mall, the city wanted high rises in that area and people had a petition going to change it to low rise buildings, they were able to stop the high rises with the petition.
Sincerely,
J.
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With respect to the potential highrise development in Port Moody, are there any plans to form an organization or committee to try to promote slower, more controlled densification? Preferable restricted to low rise construction. If so, I would like to participate.
Thanks,
D.
Follow-up:
The only positive aspects to high density is that it will be beneficial to some local businesses. I’m sure there are others that I am not aware of. Presumably the city will benefit from a larger tax base, although it might not make up for any lost industrial/commercial tax.
The strain on the infrastructure will be apparent with fast population growth. One example is that rapid transit tends to make it easier to commit crime, resulting in the need for an increased police force.
Port Moody has a small irregular land base – concentrated high rise development creates a closed in atmosphere such as in Suter Brook. I do not want to lose that feeling of openness when I walk around the city. I am aware that there is a need to increase density but I would rather have slow controlled growth, preferably as in low rise construction, led by the City rather than developers. No more spot rezoning. It is up to the City to lead the process and demand sustainability from developers and builders who by now will be falling over themselves to get rolling.
there seems to be a mistaken assumption that all new residents will use the new Evergreen line for their transportation needs exclusively. Will the City ask the new residents for proof of their transit plans?Even the new building at Murray St and St. Johns appears massive and I believe it is only four levels. At this time there is a 186 unit building going up next to my building which presumably will result in another 250+ vehicles on our roads. With the Murray connector not happening, traffic will be interesting around here.
I have lived in Moody centre for 11 years. (Terravista & Henry Sts) I chose to live here for it’s openess and liveability. I can walk the city and not feel dwarfed by high rises and buffeted by the wind tunnels they create. A number of years ago I attended a design charette in Moody centre in which as I recall, many of the participants requested ‘no more high rises’. High rises have their place in urban settings, but as a background, not the focus
I feel as an individual that I have little influence with the city. I would hope that collectively we might have a greater impact.
D.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
I don’t see any positive, unless you like more congestion on the roads and more ugly highrises.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
More traffic to an already cover burdened road system. Turning a beautiful community into oa concrete jungle. Making the city less attractive and affordable to the average person.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
I see no benefit at all. The only winners are the greedy developers who can’t stand to see any green space and the city who are constantly after more tax money.
4. Additional comments?
I believe that with the adding of high buildings and the increase in people as well as their vehicles at a time when the economy is not so great is a big mistake. Also not to mention the pollution all these new residences will be creating with their vehicles and the traffic jams.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
19 years, approx.
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Douglas and St. John’s
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Port Moody had the “small town” appeal – which will be lost with such development. Port Moody will lose it’s charm, sense of community. Concrete jungles are nothing but over-congested, polluted areas with NO SENSE of what home is!
M. and R.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
None.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Traffic congestion.
Roadside parking.
4. Additional comments?
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
11 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Barnet Hwy and Clarke St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
We liked the house.
C. and A.

****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
None.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Increased traffic congestion.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Increased traffic noise and reduced on-street parking.
4. Additional comments?
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
13 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Clarke St. and Barnet Hwy.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Quiet neighbourhood, less traffic.
K.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
I do not see any.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Congestion, loses its small town feel.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Loss of sun 😦 . Lose parking. Traffic noise!! Boo.
4. Additional comments?
Slow down people! Leave us be! We like it this way.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
13 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Barnet Hwy / Clarke St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
For how it is now. It’s quaint heritage!
T.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
None. When residents of Moody Centre had little or no say in writing the draft OCP.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
The draft OCP allows land assessment to rise and the city to increase property taxes. This forces long time residents on fixed income out of their older homes so that developers can build 6+ storey buildings.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
No benefits. The draft OCP visions all the older homes in the 2100 block of Clarke and St. John St. being replaced by 6+ storey buildings. This vision benefits the developers, more profit for speculators and increases taxes to the city.
4. Additional comments?
Moody Centre is a unique neighbourhood with a distinct character that most residents want to maintain. It is old, it has character, it is Port Moody. It is not the latest fad offered up by the developers such as Newport, Suterbrook or Klahanie. The residents of Mood Centre want this neighbourhood the way it is and not what city staff and the developers envision through the draft OCP.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
14 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Clarke & Barnet
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
The treed boulevard on the south side of Clarke Street and far away from Inlet Centre.
P.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Additional traffic cancels any positive impact.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Traffic congestion is bad enough already along Clarke St. Very difficult to leave one’s home by car between 3:30-7:00 pm due to heavy traffic.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Difficult to cross street, taking dog for walk is dangerous. Fumes and noise annoying.
4. Additional comments?
Trying to turn into where I live by car is time consuming. No one wants to let someone turn left into complex where one lives.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
20 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Barnet Hwy and Clarke St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Nice quiet traffic, close to downtown.
T.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
The only positive would be to change the waterfront. High building wouldn’t mess up the residential area.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
We are having a big traffic issue already. Imagine with 35,000 more families coming to a small community like Port Moody.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
I would lose my mountain view and would hate to look at all that concrete buildings around me.
4. Additional comments?
We had built our dream home in the heart of our heritage city called Port Moody.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
18 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Williams and St. George
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Was a small quiet community with lots of view. Felt almost in the country living but yet close to all amenities. If this would change, can’t call it heritage Port Moody.
J. and M.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Rejuvenate “old town” commercial districts along Clarke St. and St. John’s St.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Building heights along Stg. John’s are way too much: will destroy the character of Moody Centre.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
6 storey buildings on St. John’s will block my view of the mountains and water.
4. Additional comments?
We need a little growth and a few changes to bring new shops and services, but nothing close to what is being proposed.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
9 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
St. John’s and Mary St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Affordable home in an attractive neighbourhood, with a decent size yard.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Sure, it would be nice to have the waterfront developed but not the other areas (residential, i.e., St. George St.). I think having Newport Village and Suterbrook and then having the waterfront developed like Granville Island (or similar quay) would be sufficient for this area of land.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Too many people in a small area, and too much traffic which is already bad, and an issue. Also, not to many places to detour (side roads) to get somewhere quickly enough.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
My view will disappear. I will be looking at buildings as opposed to the mountains. I will be listening to a lot more noise (cars, people, police, transit, fire dept., etc.). St. John’s is a short run – don’t make it unpleasant with high and lots of buildings.
4. Additional comments?
I also do not like the idea of mixing apartments with single family homes. if you have an area of all homes then I wouldn’t want to be beside an apartment building. These should be separated. Also, does not look pretty. Makes area look tacky.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
13 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Hugh St. and St. John’s St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Quiet, relaxed community, nice views, near the water, very charming. Love the heritage buildings sand homes. Non-commercialized. Too bad its going to change, not minimally but drastically. Won’t live here after. Will not have a view and will be too congested. It’s a real shame!! Don’t make too many drastic changes to Port Moody – it will lose a lot!!
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
If not high-priced, as usual, good for carless people to be close to transportation.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
I hope they each don’t have a dog! Rocky Point (help!).
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Congestion of cars already! Will the main be carshare?
4. Additional comments?
20 storeys? Not healthy for people. Maybe kiss your historical character goodbye!
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
10 years.
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Williams and Henry
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Quiet (gone). Trees (almost gone). View – ?!
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Could control population density sensibly.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Opposed to high-rise buildings. Carriage/laneway homes can double the population.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Compromising salt water view. Low rise will give sufficient density.
4. Additional comments?
Do not sacrifice our heritage area for population density!
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
10 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Williams @ Terravista
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
The unique heritage.
C.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Development must happen. I am sure there are benefits to be had, unfortunately emotions are at the forefront right now.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Less public park space, noise and air quality. Our use of existing park space. Over population, increased user fees, loss of character.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Loss of view, increased population, traffic congestion. Property values/taxes. Increased crime.
4. Additional comments?
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
30 and 40 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Elgin and St. John’s
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Small town feel close to Van.
B. and S.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?

2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Loss of heritage feel with building heights of 6 to 20 storeys.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Total loss of mountain view.
4. Additional comments?
Keep any high-rises at or near Suterbrook, Newport area.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
35 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Barnet and St. John’s
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Heritage and character homes of Moody Centre.
M.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Better shopping (?). Grocery store.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
More traffic, rat racing down my street. Ruining the heritage feel of neighbourhood with highrises. Blocking views.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
More traffic, unsafe neighbourhood; increased noise and pollution. Decreasing our property value if a highrise tower looks into our backyard (St. John’s and Albert zoned for 12 storeys). I don’t put my kids in Port Moody activities after 3 pm because of traffic. I take them to Coquitlam.
4. Additional comments?
I feel our neighbourhood is the one most impacted by Port Moody’s development and yet we are not consulted. Feels like developers making all decisions. We have already seen a lot of density on Ioco Road and we don’t have infrastructure for more population.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
8 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
St. George and Douglas St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Heritage houses/buildings, views of ocean and mountain.
S.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
New infrastructure along with high density living would attract new business and larger tax base and better economy.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
No new infrastructure.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Bringing in new business (grocery, medical, etc.)
4. Additional comments?
We need to look at the whole picture of Moody Centre and what is best for the future.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
15 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
St. George & Williams
D.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Everything.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
The panhandlers. But that is correctable – citizens to action.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Nothing.
4. Additional comments?
Port Moody is a great city and nothing can or will change that. My first home was where the police station is today.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
60 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Willliams and St. George
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
My family came to Moody with the refinery in 1954.
D.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
None.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
More traffic and congestion and pollution. Stress on wildlife. Impaired view of inlet and decreased natural beauty of area.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
For us on Noble Court the view would be negative and traffic on Gatensbury even worse and more dangerous than it is now. More car traffic would decrease pedestrian safety and ease of walking about.
4. Additional comments?
I really dislike the ugly development being completed on Moody at St. John’s. Looks like a jail or halfway house and is too high and out of character for the area which should be preserved. […?]
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
6 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Noble Court/Gatensbury
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Outstanding natural beauty and wildlife and old-fashioned city shopping area. Single family homes with lovely views and gardens with wonderful parks teeming with wildlife.
A.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Creative, innovative and imaginative land use and density development, e.g., Santiago Calatrava.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
The possibility of simply repeating 19th century architecture and the same as Suterbrook and Newport developments.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Hopefully (1) an increase in my soul perspectives and (2) my spirit of philanthropy, giving forward and community generosity; as well as (3) an attitude of enchantment and enlightenment that is wider, (4) more pluralistic and inclusive, and (5) that has a deeper sense of ecological and ecumenical values, vision and vibrancy.
4. Additional comments?
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
30 years in Port Moody, 10 in Moody Centre
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Henry and Moody
6. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
The unique character design of the house.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
I do not see any positive impacts for the areas in question.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Increased density brings increased crime. Loss of urban forest and greenspace. Negative impacts on wildlife in one of the last areas available to them.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Loss of enjoyment of our property. Increased traffic will make it even more difficult for residents to exit city. Increased population will make the area less liveable.
4. Additional comments?
See attached. Also the instability of the land – i.e., sand not hard_____? under soil.
Attached as follows:
Partial list of wildlife seen in our area during our time here –
Bears
Eagles
Brown owls
Snowy owls
Coyotes
Stellar jays
Thrushes
3 different types of woodpeckers
Hawks
Robins
Raccoons
Skunks
Badgers
Hummingbirds
Bobcaat
Grey and black squirrels
Bats
Chipmunks
Canadian geese
Many other birds
Seals
Ravens
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
27 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Hugh and Henry
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Single family homes with large lot. Small town feeling. Natural beauty in heritage mixed with green space. The peace and quiet.
D.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
I cannot conceive of any positive impacts in a plan that has not been thought out carefully.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
A train is only transporting people from one town to another, to cut down in the existing congestion caused by too many cars being forced through a small corridor. It’s crazy to think that by densifying a crowded area it’s going to make an improvement. Negative impacts are that no infrastructure improvements are even being suggested to go along with this plan. where are they going to get the extra water for all these people and businesses.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
I don’t like skytrain. Since it’s conception. The crime rate to any area that it goes to seems to increase dramatically. I first came to Port Moody because it was different from the other congested cities.
4. Additional comments?
When the new councillors were trying to get elected every one stood on the platform of how they liked the small town feel of Port Moody. This area is historically the first township in BC. We are this year celebrating 100 years, yet the powers that be have left nothing in their schemes to protect the heritage of this beautiful city. Years ago Port Moody received an award for the most liveable city. I would like the answer to the question of who is generating the push to force the population to double or triple in such a short time? And why? Years ago David Suzuki came to Port Moody and did a talk, stating that it would be better to grow slowly and have the proper infrastructure in place first. Now is not the time to over develop an area not capable of absorbing such ridiculous increases in population growth – with the housing market in a downturn.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
27 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Hugh & Henry St
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
We had lived (rented) in Port Moody before and liked the small town feel of the place. There was not the hustle and bustle that is being forced now with the widening of St. John’s Street. Single family homes, large bush areas, the chines, the beautiful view of the ocean and heritage homes. The peace and serenity and quiet of the area. At night you can still look up and see the stars.
Moody Centre is a small oasis in a sea of development. The best gift we can leave our children is the untouched wilderness sand wild animals that remain, and stand as the last bastion of the traditional neighbourhood.
B.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
This area could become a destination area rather than simply a ‘drive-thru’ to Inlet Centre (Newport Village), or Heritage Mountain or Heritage Woods or Pleasantside OR a parking lot for Rocky Point visitors.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Without the Murray Street connector to the Barnet Highway, there will be more traffic issues. Without addressing the current parking issues, parking problems will get worse.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
The liveability of the entire neighbourhood will be upgraded.
4. Additional comments?
This area needs a tremendous face-lift in order to maintain it’s heritage character.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
Six and a half years.
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Clarke and Grant Streets.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
We started a small business on Clarke Street and wanted to live closer to the business. We sold our interest in the business yet decided to keep our residence. We like the neighbourhood and feel there is great potential for this neighbourhood.
D.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
I do not see positive impacts of doubling the population of Port Moody. The city is only interested in more dollars coming in and not doing too much to improve the roads and infrastructure.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
If we are to increase population, not all will be using transit. Not many will be interested in TOD. Before any highrises should be built, we should take care of the problems we have now, such as increased traffic and no improvements were done to ease traffic by the overpass.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
The staff or engineers that make the decisions are not obviously stuck in traffic on St. John’s and Clarke every day. They have no clue how bad the area is between 4 and 6 pm. And the transit is too expensive, so people will keep driving to work.
4. Additional comments?
If highrises are built on the north side of St. John’s, it will change everything. There will be no view of the mountains, and we will feel like driving through a tunnel. That will destroy the heritage look of the area.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
Myself – 10 years. My husband – 20 years.
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Ungless and Noon’s Creek
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
I was attracted to live here because of the small town feeling. There used to be so many trees, lush green. The inlet area has been preserved, thank goodness. But now there are too many highrises, and it has changed the area completely, not for the better.
M.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Create more parks and use tax revenue to improve community resources (e.g. recreation centre, parks, pay off Firehall).
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
I hope that the building heights along St. John’s won’t exceed four stories.
I don’t like the idea of 20 story buildings being scattered throughout the waterfront area (too tall – I think the idea of placing these buildings (10 story) along the hillside should be seriously considered instead.)
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
I’m concerned that the tall buildings being proposed will put too much pressure on our roads and general infrastructure. I’m also worried that we’ll lose the historic feel to Port Moody. I value being able to see the mountains easily as one walks through Port Moody.
4. Additional comments?
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
8 years in Town Centre and we lived on Bedard Street for two years.
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Grant and St. George St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Historic feel to the community
– nature is close by
– we like that it’s possible to walk places
– it’s not overly densified with people
– parks
– Rocky Point
– relatively easy to commute to and from
– we love our 100 + years old house
– you can run a home based business
– great neighbourhood
C.
****************
1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Very little. Some additional retail may be beneficial, including a small grocery store and/or produce, bakery, etc. Attracting jobs and business could be an advantage to the area.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Many. Moody Centre is not appropriate for high density residential. Land base is too narrow between water and chines, infrastructure is very poor. Infrastructure, including parks, is already overloaded.
Many geographic problems, including:
clogged emergency routes,
air quality (geographic bowl – low land surrounded by higher land)
soil quality (pollution, soft soil, sensitive to earth tremors)
lower area north of St. John’s especially vulnerable to flooding
upper area south of St. John’s vulnerable to slides (e.g.,1979 chines slide)
The proposed population densification would change the heritage character of the neighbourhood. Green and open space would be impacted. Additional tree loss would occur.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Very few potential benefits (see above); many concerns. I moved here for the feel of nature. I moved to Port Moody to get away from a neighbourhood that was transformed from character into soul-less – no character, just ugly and less green. I loved the green, the wildlife, the character, the sense of community, Rocky Point Park (more when it was less crowded and commercialized). All of the things I came for have endured great stress, and should not be devalued further. I don’t want to live in a dense tower-filled neighbourhood, and Moody Centre can’t handle the density anyway.
I have taken transit, driven, and walked in Port Moody. All have become more difficult over the last few years. St. John’s is dangerous. Transit is overcrowded and expensive. When driving, I try to avoid the main arteries. Sometimes my residential street is clogged with commuter cars.
4. Additional comments?
The draft OCP as it currently stands disrespects the residents and all of the prior input given for the OCP “finalized” in early 2011. It does not reflect the wishes of the great majority of the people living here. It seems to reflect a vision of developers and anyone else who might stand to cash in. The process has not been transparent, and has been under the radar of most people. Council was not elected on this plan.
A few modest, low-level (4 storeys maximum) could potentially be tolerated, especially if it was non-residential and had a heritage look.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
16 years.
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Hugh/St. George
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Nature, Rocky Point Park, heritage, sense of community, no ugly towers.
H.
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1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
none
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
No benefits to me personally
Comment: How can a tremendous increase in population in this small area benefit anyone who resides here. More vehicles on the road, more air pollution, tall buildings blocking the views, there will be a need to increase police and fire personnel which will result in higher property taxes, destruction of wildlife habitat, destruction of quaint small houses to be replaced by huge monster homes that use more energy and demand more services from the city which again means higher property taxes to those that are satisfied with the status-quo.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
Approx. 16 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Williams St. and St. George St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Small town atmosphere, beautiful views, abundance of wildlife, relatively clean air, tall trees and a waterfront that is uncrowded.
L.
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1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
n/a
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Aside from its likely negative impact on traffic, crime and overcrowding, the proposed plan’s sheer scale is dehumanizing and seriously threatens quality of life.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Aside from obliterating my view of Burrard Inlet, the proposed plan makes me worry about overpopulation, crime and traffic congestion.
4. Additional comments?
The massive development envisioned by this plan smacks of planning megalomania and is a declaration of war on the values of Moody Centre residents. The string of towers in the plan can only be described as a strip mall on steroids.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
12 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Grant and Jane Streets
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Like many who live here, I was attracted to this area by its small-town feel, its peace, liveability and slower place – and scenic beauty!
M.
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1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
no answer
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
I am concerned about plans to densify Moody Centre, especially the plan to build highrises between Moody and Williams on St. John’s St. This will ruin the charm of Port Moody, add to the strain on city services, increase traffic to an absurd level, and destroy the character of Moody Centre.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?
Personally, I am already aggravated and inconvenienced by increased traffic flow through Port Moody, especially at the base of Gatensbury, near which I live. More traffic there will pose greater dhanger to area residents. The intersection of Moody and St. John’s will become unbearable if these #s in population increase.
4. Additional comments?
At the last meeting at the vet’s [Legion] centre, the idea of having our view destroyed was pooh-poohed. However, a person purchases a home, often with a view in mind. If highrises are built, our view on Jane Street – our view of the water – is gone. Part of it is gone already because of the bylaw variance which allowed the development on Moody and St. John’s to be 5 storeys, instead of four (thereby setting a precedent).
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?
12 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Grant and Jane Street
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
I was attracted to this area because of the promised heritage bylaw – which was subsequently promised year after year. Not only did it never materialize, but monster houses are replacing heritage homes and now the heritage character faces further damage through densification.
J.
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1. What do you see as positive impacts, if any?
Once the Sky Train comes to our neighbourhood, we would definitely use it on the occasions we need to go downtown to shop, see a soccer game, or attend to business. We have no hesitation walking the few blocks to the West Coast Express station.
2. What do you see as negative impacts, if any?
Traffic: There is no new solution to our Moody Centre traffic woes. Not everyone will be taking the sky train on a regular enough basis to actually reduce our traffic volume. High densities proposed near Coquitlam Centre, Coronation, Klahanie/Suterbrook, Ioco Station, Moody Centre Station would exacerbate the problem greatly. Without the Murray/Clarke connector or a comprehensive traffic management plan, it would be irresponsible to invite massive density without a traffic resolution.
Park land: The developers are eager to develop every inch of any properties they can acquire; however, no one seems to want to incorporate park/green spaces. We can’t expect Rocky Point Park to be the only park space dedicated to the entire Moody Centre area. Any potential development must implement amenity/park/green spaces. The city does not have to be the contributor of parkland to the benefit of developers. Besides that, the city doesn’t own enough land to do so.
Heritage Conservation/Character: With the allowance of 3 to 6 storey designations in our Heritage revitalization/character areas, we are concerned this kind of density will discourage property owners from maintaining their heritage buildings. Although some of the single family designations along St. George St. will maintain some of the character there, Clarke and St. Johns St. contain some of the most interesting heritage buildings.
Gateway/Western Port Moody Development: As property owners in this area, it is of concern that there is a push from developers/holding partners to highly densify the western end in order to allow amenities for Glenayre, College Park, East Hill and other uphill neighbourhoods. A majority of people living in the immediate vicinity are not in favour of this amount of development here, no matter what the amenities.
Amount of Density: We don’t believe it’s necessary to add so much density to Moody Centre. There are some appropriate locations for further transit oriented density (Westcoast Express Station, Flavelle site), but views should not be impacted by highrise development.
View Corridors: There is a lot of concern about view impacts if higher density is allowed on the northern side of Moody Centre. Shadowing from blocks of multifamily (up to 6 storeys) and midrises is also of concern.
Zoning Grab: In areas like St. George St.and Clarke St., some neighbours could be pitted against each other as they do not share the same zoning. Residents may sell out to prospectors on the back of upzoning and our heritage conservation/character areas would be reduced or annihilated. We would rather see a greater variety of mixed densities including carriage houses, duplexes and four-plexes.
3. What concerns or benefits do you see applying to you personally?:
Construction traffic has been annoying, but is a necessary evil at this point. As residents of Western Port Moody, we find it insulting when residents from other areas of Port Moody throw NIMBYism in our faces. We are bearing the brunt of most of the contruction/traffic interruption, as well as the noise and view impacts. Speculators are busy trying to buy as many properties as possible at lowball prices. Although most of us are in favour of some forms of development, is must be responsible, have supporting infrastructure and fit in with the character of the area. Some of us moved to Moody Centre because we loved the big yards and character of the old houses. This too should be respected in the OCP. We don’t need to densify the entire area! We have already met our population growth targets as stipulated by Metro Vancouver.
5. How long have you lived in Moody Centre?:
15 years
6. What is the nearest intersection to your address?
Douglas and Clarke St.
7. Why were you attracted to live in Moody Centre?
Moody Centre has always had such a positive vibe. Unique character houses, big yards, mountain views, easy access to downtown Vancouver and to the ocean via the Rocky Point boat launch were all factors. We try to support the local businesses and like the variety of restaurants. Parking is free. We can walk to the pubs, the Legion, Rocky Point park. Our property investment is safe as this area remains desirable.
W.

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Additional feedback and information
******************************************

Petition text 1- original with signatures sent under separate cover

Note: The survey was done in summer 2012 when the group called themselves the West Port Moody property owners.
1) As a West Port Moody property owner, have you ever been consulted by the group calling themselves the “West Port Moody Property Owners”?
2) Are you in favour of mass densification (mid to highrises, multi-family, commercial, etc.) to bring the necessary 15,000 residents to warrant a skytrain station as far west as possible? (ie: Andres Wines site)
3) Are you in favour of the city earmarking money to foot the tab ($30 to $35 million extra) to ensure that a station is built in West Port Moody?

The results were 33/33 resounding “NOs” in all three issues. That was only in the two blocks east of Barnet on Clarke St.
****************

Petition text 2- original with signatures sent under separate cover
St. George St.
Results: 19 out of 20 people approached signed the petition.
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Re public hearing Jan 22, 2013
I would like to express my disappointment with the Mayor and City Council and the Port Moody City Planning department for in By Law 2950 introducing an opportunity to change the commitments made Port Moody’s Official Community Plan (OCP), Waterfront and Area Economic Visioning Study and the principals established by the Heritage Commission. It is understandable to open up the Official Community Plan for Special Study Areas where the plan is silent but not blatantly ignore the OCP where it is well established and discussed like Moody Center. Please consider the attached brief submitted by Trevor Williams and Susan Ames 10 Noble Crt.for part of the package for this evenings meeting.
Word doc attachment to email:
Summary of Residents’ Concerns to By Law 2950
When a family chooses a community to live in they invest in establishing long term relationships with schools, neighbors and community businesses. They make their choices based upon the City’s commitments articulated in the City of Port Moody Official Community Plan ( OCP) and other such studies commissioned by the City. There is an expectation that the City has made a commitment and will not make significant deviation without a profound reason. In my opinion the current Port Moody City Council By Law 2950 is in its attempt to designate the three properties as Special Study Areas and to propose a review which would result in significantly different land use effecting the previously established commitments. This in my opinion is contrary to the spirit of a number of current Port Moody stated values and directions. Besides changing the nature of Port Moody it could result financial loss to many residents including myself.
The following is an attempt to point out how the proposed By Law 2950 violates the long term commitment to Port Moody’s documented values:
1. Compromising Port Moody’s Heritage Vision
a) 3.1 The Overall Community Vision as stated in Port Moody’s Official Community Plan
Port Moody, City of the Arts, is a unique, safe, vibrant waterfront city of strong neighbourhoods; a complete community that is sustainable and values its natural environment and heritage character as well as:
• Protecting, remediating and enhancing the community’s environmentally sensitive resources, recreation areas and heritage assets for public use and enjoyment;
• Maintaining the “small town” character of the community;
• Encouraging developments that respect the community and are functional, universally accessible, architecturally sympathetic and environmentally sound.
b) Some Principals Established by the Heritage Commission (Port Moody)
Waterfront development should be linked to the Moody Centre
The City should be sensitive to the natural development of the inlet and should not let Rocky Point become a concrete development like Lonsdale or New Westminster Quays
An Environmental Sensitivity Area ( ESA) Study should precede any Waterfront Visioning Study
c) Waterfront and Area Economic Visioning Study 1998 & 2003 (Port Moody)
“In the event that the Interfor operation should cease production or decide to relocate, then consideration should be given to a long term use for this strategically located site, that would both generate employment and improve public waterfront access and use. As such, a variety of uses – Business Park, commercial, hospitality and leisure – could be accommodated on this site, some of which could be potentially located within the existing mill buildings. The site could build on the industrial heritage theme present in Moody Centre and use adaptive reuse of buildings, artifacts, displays, interpretive signage and public art to convey the story of sawmilling. The site could be named the Old Mill Landing, and it would be seen as complementary to and not in competition with Moody Center.
Moody Centre (including Clarke Street and the western portion of St. Johns Street from Moody Street to the Barnet Highway)
Proposed Vision: CPR Townsite (Pioneer Industrial Theme)
Develop an attractive and exciting living heritage and industrial area centered on the intersection of Clarke and Queens Streets. To pursue this vision, work with business operators and property owners to restore this area’s key heritage buildings and follow design guidelines to ensure compatible and complementary infill construction.
Clearly in drafting By Law 2950 Port Moody City Council is opening the door to ignore all previously stated values and commitments as outlined above.
2. Compromising the Spirit of the Current Port Moody’s Official Community Plan
2.4.2 Port Moody’s Resident Labour Force and Local Employment Opportunities
One of the goals of this Official Community Plan is the development of a complete community within Port Moody. Among other objectives, a complete community involves achieving a balance between the numbers of employment.
Centering high density residents near the Rapid Transit, and eliminating large employer only positions, make Port Moody a bedroom community.
3. Proposing an Opportunity to Dramatically Change Land Usage in Port Moody
Port Moody’s Official Community Plan articulates the principals and policies for Port Moody’s land use and is viewed as commitment to the City’s residents. By law 2950 prescribes a study that represents a significant variance from this Plan. Consider Moody Center as previously as an example:
15.2 Moody Centre (from Port Moody’s Official Community Plan)
(Clarke Street and the western portion of St. Johns Street from Moody Street to the Barnet Highway)
Moody Centre encompasses the south shore of Port Moody and is the City’s most diverse neighborhood from a land use perspective. It is composed of a number of sub-areas, each of which has its own character. These sub-areas include the waterfront industrial area, which is bounded on the east by the Mill and Timber sawmill site and on the west by Pacific Coast Terminals.
8.10 Residential Densities (from Port Moody’s Official Community Plan)
In order to achieve its housing goals, Port Moody has provided for a range of housing forms and densities in this community plan:
8.10.2 Multi -family Forms (from Port Moody’s Official Community Plan)
a. Low Density Multi-family Forms (2-3 storeys)
b. Medium Density Multi-Family Form (up to 4 storeys)
c. High Density Multi-Family Form: Low-Rise (up to 4 storeys)
d. Density Mixed Use Comprehensive Development: Mid-Rise (up to 5 storeys)
e. High Density Multi-Family Form: High Rise (up to 26 storeys)
This designation is limited to the Inlet Centre neighborhood and provides for high density residential development predominantly in the form of apartment buildings that may include high-rise structures over five story’s in height
Policies (under 8.10 of Port Moody’s Official Community Plan)
4. Additional comments?
The City shall continue to pursue revitalization of the Moody Centre historic commercial area, with emphasis on a strong heritage theme and a pedestrian oriented environment. This will be accomplished through:
undertaking the development of zoning and development permit area guidelines for intensive residential development forms in keeping with the scale and character of existing low density single family areas e.g. laneway housing, duplexes, tri-plex, four-plex, small lot subdivisions.
8. The maximum density of multi-family in areas designated for multi-family residential and commercial uses will generally range between 30 and 80units per acre with a maximum building height of three story’s. As well, a fourth story may be considered on the north side of St. Johns Street, with the exception of the properties located at 2718-2732 St. Johns Street and 2713-2725 Clarke Street where a fifth storey may be considered, where a proposed project exhibits an exceptional architectural design, maintains view corridors and steps back upper storeys.
Why is the City Council in By Law 2950 “opening the door” to such a dramatic whole scale change in land use and population density? I n January 17 MCCA meeting no clear answer was provided? Is this being driven by Developers? There appears to be a lot of answers missing to why City Council is providing an opportunity to break their commitments made to us in the OCP!!!
(Submitted by Trevor Williams and Susan Ames 10 Noble Court)

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Re Public Hearing, January 22, 2013, Special Study Areas
With the dramatic changes proposed for Moody Centre in the latest OCP draft presented in late 2012, and the size and potential scope of the special study areas (“SSA”), it is necessary to address both the SSA and the draft OCP at the same time. Both represent the possibility of major changes to the make-up of Port Moody, and should not be addressed in isolation of one another.
At the January 17, 2013 meeting hosted by the Moody Centre Community Association, a question was asked about parks and green space requirements if densification should occur. The response was that parks and green space would be addressed in the next update of the Master Parks and Recreation Plan. Parks and green space needs to be part of the OCP and SSA discussion; not separated – just one example of what we need for a complete plan.
More details are needed on what may affect the community, and all issues identified. Broad input is necessary.
Thank you.
H. Mason
Port Moody
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Dear Heritage BC, Heritage Canada Foundation, the Vancouver Sun, The Tri-City News, Coquitlam Now, and Oliver Schneider:

I’m writing to inform you that Port Moody’s heritage district (Moody Centre) is imperiled. Last night, I received an email from the neighbourhood association for this area, of which I am a member. I do not represent the association in writing this email though, but am a concerned citizen who lives in a 100+ year old home in the affected neighbourhood.

The problem? The charm and beauty of Port Moody is about to be destroyed. Our waterfront, which is a haven and destination for so many is charted to become a corridor of high rises. These plans would completely transform the neighbourhood and town. Our heritage neighbourhood would lose its character. Located on the north side of a slope, plans to densify on the north side would also make this neighbourhood a tunnel of darkness. With SW British Columbia’s rainy weather, this would be untenable.

In addition, Port Moody is one of Metro-Vancouver’s Ground Zeros for soil liquefaction, if there’s an earthquake. The building of high rises here is very unwise. See GeoMap Vancouver, geological map of the Vancouver Metropolitan area; Turner, R J W; Clague, J J; Groulx, B J; Journeay, J M. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 3511, 1998:

http://geoscan.ess.nrcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/starfinder/0?path=geoscan.downloade.fl&id=fastlink&pass=&format=FLDOWNLOADE&search=R=209909

Quick References:

The draft OCP will be presented to Port Moody City Council Tuesday, March 12th, at 7:00 p.m.

Mayor Mike Clay can be reached here: mclay@portmoody.ca or at 604.469.4515.

The draft OCP which outlines the changes can be found here (pages 79-426):

https://portmoody.civicweb.net/Documents/DocumentList.aspx?ID=14397

I’ve lived here for years waiting for a promised heritage bylaw, but the impetus has now been ground into the dust by these new proposals which are being fast tracked so quickly there is no time for residents of this working class heritage neighbourhood to respond or effectively mount opposition.

The city has redefined the heritage area and council is attempting to quickly ram through changes that would allow development of 20-28 story high rises in Moody Centre. Unfortunately, the last mayor, Joe Trasolini, worked to bring SkyTrain through Port Moody (by 2016) and, now, ***though it is not necessary or required to do so,*** City Council is opening the floodgates for development.

See http://www.evergreenline.gov.bc.ca/

The City of Port Moody anticipates ratifying the Official Community Plan (OCP) this summer, though the latest draft **which includes major changes** was only released last Friday. The draft will be presented to council tomorrow night. Citizens of the town only learned of these major changes very recently, just within the last several months. The information the city had previously given us was of a very different nature. In addition, the pace at which these changes are being shoved through and the lack of true dialogue over the matter is highly undemocratic.

Concerns in a nutshell:

* Six-story buildings in areas currently limited to four stories.
* Four 20-story high rises in the downtown core (St. Johns Street from Moody to Williams Streets)
* Three-story multifamily buildings in a single detached home residential neighbourhood (St. George Street)
* Remaining sawmill developed into an “Oceanfront District” that includes a 28-story building.
* Up to 30-story high rises in current high rise section
* No additional green space
* Heritage homes will be demolished
* Additional traffic burden is unaddressed
* Services supporting increased population unaddressed
* High risk of liquefaction of soil from earthquakes

Council is moving too quickly and its rashness will cause the destruction of a jewel of a city. Nor is it necessary for the city to densify to this degree simply because of SkyTrain. I hope this message will inform you of what’s happening if you have not already been informed. I also hope it will be a call to action in speaking out against Port Moody City Council’s proposed Official Community Plan. It isn’t often that you find a pleasant city with a defined character in the midst of a booming metropolis. That doesn’t have to change or change to the degree that is being proposed.

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

JPF

****************
I have been a resident of Port Moody for over 31 years, and it breaks my heart to see some of the proposals put forward in the current OCP, turning our historic, quaint city into a sea of high rises. No doubt the people pushing these changes live up on the mountain, not in the historic part of Port Moody that will be so strongly affected by this OCP.

As I’ve said before, I’m not against change – by all means further beautify our waterfront to the west of Rocky Point and make it a destination for restaurants and shops – but putting high-rises all along the south side of the Inlet, on St. John’s, etc., totally destroying the view and ambience of downtown Port Moody, is a travesty.

Lastly, it will hardly be a City of the Arts anymore; might as well drop that tag-line if you plan to move forward with these plans.

P.
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Submitted to the Tri-City News; and MCCA

Speak up on Port Moody’s future development
Published: March 22, 2013 11:00 AM
Updated: March 22, 2013 12:02 PM

The Editor,

The latest draft of Port Moody’s Official Community Plan is a document that, among many other alarming changes, would usher in a wall of 20-storey skyscrapers, a kind of strip mall on steroids, running through Moody Centre, and turn many quiet neighbourhoods into swaths of six-storey buildings.

During the March 12 Port Moody council meeting at which the proposed plan was unveiled, I couldn’t help but think of the grandiose plans for freeway construction through Vancouver in the 1960s, where residents of Strathcona, Chinatown and Gastown were told to make way for the bulldozers — step aside, suckers, you can’t stop progress.

Now it’s 2013 and we’re told we must surrender their neighbourhoods not to a freeway but, we are told, to accommodate Skytrain. Although public transit may seem on the surface like a more defensible reason for wiping out large sections of a unique and lovely place, the situation isn’t that much different. New excuse, same hubris: One side, suckers; bulldozers coming up.

Aside from the plan itself and how it strongarms our town, the way in which it has taken shape is more than a little worrying — particularly the fickle changes of building heights in large areas of the plan in the past few weeks. At the council meeting I attended there was no ready explanation, for instance, as to why the site now occupied by the Flavelle mill is now slated for 28-storey buildings, while the plan only a few weeks back set the maximum at 12 storeys on the site. Other areas have seen building heights bounce from three stories, to six, and back to three again. With its fluctuating numbers, the OCP map is starting to look a little like a Keno machine. It does not inspire a lot of faith in the city’s claim that its vision for Port Moody is dictated by rock-solid planning principles.

I urge people to speak out about this plan in the coming weeks and months because the version endorsed by council this week will, if unchallenged, turn peaceful Moody Centre into something that could kindly be called Metrotown East. I would also urge residents to remind council, often, that we are under no obligation to increase density in the name of Skytrain; and to follow the example of Vancouver residents in the ’60s and say ‘No’ to developer opportunism and planning megalomania.

Mark Falkenberg, Port Moody

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Email 1
We live on Klahanie Drive and are opposed to the plans for high rises and a huge population increase. We will at attending the OCP public processes and stating our objections.

Email 2 follow-up

We just came back from the OCP and felt like we were at a Time Share Presentation. The staff seem to be doing their best to pressure people into thinking about all these changes as positive. I was rebuked, and not subtly, when I said I wasn’t in favour of high density or high rises, as were a few other people around me. The staff, in my opinion, should be “neutral” conduits of information, not sales people.

I’m still stunned by the proposed changes. If we wanted to live in a sea of high rises and a high density area we would have moved to the West End or Metro Town.

J.
****************
The Council is not protecting the residents of Port Moody Center, and indeed, all of the citizens of Port Moody.

Elaine Gold’s column in the Tri City News lists one violation of land use after another.

Has anyone investigated the possibility of court action, injunctions to stop or alter the present plan?

We have already seen how we can be tricked by developers — Look at the restaurant in our waterfront park.

People in Old Town and other areas of the city are going to be robbed of their right to make their own choice about kind of community they wish to live in. We have made our choices and now have to defend them.

How can we stop or slowdown the process that Staff, Council and Developers seem determined to lay on us?

****************
Submitted to the Tri-City News; and MCCA

Re: “A Sustainable Vision for Moody or Sardine City?
Friday, May 3, 2013

Ms. Golds’ Green Scene article commenting on the current draft of Port Moody’s OCP is well articulated and most residents would find agreeable.

However, there are two issues of development which she excludes and avoids mentioning.

First, Port Moody, as a “City for the Arts”, will also need additional arts and cultural facilities (including places of worship). Sport fields, play grounds, and parks are essential, but they are not the only places where citizens of all ages are able to exercise their spirit of being alive, where they can find meaning and purpose, where they are able to experience a sense of tranquility and serenity, dignity and identity, and also where community development grows.

Second, Ms. Golds is caught in the “highrise” trap of the conceptual designs of development density. This trap is well illustrated in the OCP panels used by the city staff for public feedback.

Each and every one of the panels shows nothing but highrises, of various heights, to illustrate the planning department’s idea of increased density. None of the panels presented show any creative design except the 19th Century thinking that taller is better. Those design presentations are patriarchal and antiquated, and reflect neither the uniqueness nor the charm that residents of Port Moody appreciate and value.

Thus, I would want to consider whether the highrise, in the topography and geography of Port Moody, is the only way, or even the best way, to go for increased density?

Highrises around sky train stations that have been built are what Ms. Golds rightly describe as “concrete jungles”. Indeed, we need to look no further in our own backyard than Newport and Suter Brook developments to see the canyons of concrete, steel, and glass.

These architectural designs may be most cost effective, but they certainly do not express ingenuity or innovation for 21st Century values, vision, or lifestyles. These sharp-cornered monsters, I would suggest, are particularly an anathema to community engagement and perhaps even to participatory democracy. Indeed, my hunch is that they lead only to what Ms. Golds calls “sardine cities” or perhaps “zombie communities”.

Surely, there are some architects and building designs that could reflect better the curvaceous and ecological environment of Port Moody as a landscape of flowing lines and organic features. I think of Bill Thom, or Douglas Cardinal, or even Santiago Calatrava or Zaha Hadid. They are visionaries who feature 21st Century creativity with ECO-DESIGNs that do not simply emphasize verticality or angularity.

Perhaps, Port Moody does not need to have “a congestion-filled future”, but rather be a community of leadership in density designs that the world will admire and residents will relish.

David Spence
Port Moody
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TO: Port Moody Council
FROM: Mr. Jan O. Voss, P.Eng
DATE: May 10, 2013
RE: Proposed OCP changes to Moody Centre

Dear Port Moody Council,

As a 15 year resident of a house on the heritage register in Moody Centre, a past president of the Moody Centre Business Association and the owner of a traffic engineering company based in Moody Centre that employs over 20 people, I am really struggling to support the proposed increased densities and future traffic demand for Moody Centre above and beyond what is currently in the OCP. I have the professional credentials to back up this concern, having been a professional traffic engineer for the past 24 years. I have personally conducted over 200 traffic impact assessments and am considered an expert in this field by my peers and many road authorities in BC including Port Moody.

What concerns me the most is the future traffic for Moody Centre and the lack to date of a viable traffic plan to accommodate the future traffic resulting from the proposed changes. I raise this concern because in the various open houses I have attended and reviewed the available background material, I have seen no mention of any planned transportation improvements to accommodate future vehicle traffic. Yes, the Evergreen Line is coming and yes, there are new accesses proposed such as the Kyle Street overpass to service new developments like the waterfront lands. However there are no east-west and/or north-south improvements to improve corridor mobility that I am aware of currently being proposed as part of the increased densification of Moody Centre.

I note that when the Klahanie and Suter Brook developments were approved by council and just as importantly supported by Port Moody residents at the time including myself, it was with the understanding that the proposed Murray-Clarke Connector would be built in the future to accommodate the traffic these developments would generate. Here we are ten years later and there still is no sign of the Murray-Clarke Connector and to make matters worse, Translink has removed it from their priority list. As someone who lives and works in Moody Centre and struggles to get around every weekday afternoon due to the traffic congestion, I cannot in good conscience support any further densification of Moody Centre without a firm commitment by the City or Translink to provide some basic transportation improvements to Moody Centre. Signalizing another intersection on St. John Street like Grant Street will help with access to new buildings like the Station development, however if you cannot get to the intersection in the first place, it really is not a “mitigation measure” to reduce the traffic impacts associated with a development.

Regarding the Evergreen Line, I am both excited and relieved that it is finally coming to Port Moody. However, it is absolutely critical that everyone understands that the provision of rapid transit to Port Moody cannot be the only transportation improvement to support increased densification of Moody Centre because it will at best address only 25% of the future person trips, with the majority still being undertaken by the private automobile. If the City of Vancouver with 22 Skytrain stations can only achieve a 25% transit modal split for commuters city wide (or over 50% for commuter trips to downtown Vancouver), there will still be the need for a viable vehicle transport plan to accommodate the remaining person trips made by the private automobile, which could be as high as 75% of all future person trips.

For your information, between 1996 and 2006 only between 9% and 14% of Port Moody residents who commuted to work used public transit. Therefore, we have a very long way to go to make public transit the dominant mode of transport in our community. Until then, there still has to be some sort of vehicle traffic plan. If not, the only result will be significantly more traffic gridlock than we are already experiencing in Moody Centre every weekday afternoon.

So I strongly encourage Council to include a viable transport plan to accommodate private vehicles to and from Moody Centre, not just new access points to developments, so that all modes of transport can be accommodated in some fashion. It was promised to Moody Centre residents once before with the Klahanie and Suter Brook developments, and should be again but with a firmer commitment this time around.

Finally, I would like to encourage Council to maximize the opportunities to provide future office space in Moody Centre so that more residents have opportunities to live and work in Moody Centre like I do. This will go a long way to helping reduce future traffic volumes resulting from the proposed densifications. With the proposed changes to Moody Centre, I am in a quandary right now as the draft OCP illustrations show a new 20+ storey tower on the building I lease right now. I know my business has a limited future in our current location due to its close proximity to the new Moody Centre Skytrain station. However, I would like to keep my business and the jobs that come with it here in Port Moody but can only do so if I have a place to rent that is not under threat of redevelopment, which I would respectfully suggest is now most of the commercial core of Moody Centre.

Regards,

Jan O. Voss, P.Eng.
Henry Street, Port Moody, B.C
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