Welcome to the Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) website

MCCA-welcome

Adopt-a-street: MCCA adopted the street area of Queens Street Plaza early in 2015, and teams meet periodically to clean the area with equipment provided by the city. If you can spare an occasional hour or so to help, please email us at mcca.pm@gmail.com, and we’ll add you to our list. This would not commit you to a set schedule, but more people willing to pitch in once in awhile will help us to keep the area clean. It’s not just cleaning — it’s interaction and community building!

MCCA Membership:  We welcome new (and lapsed) members at any time.  Must be 19+ and reside in the Moody Centre catchment area (see map).  Annual fee is $5/year. Payment can be made at any event, or by contacting MCCA to arrange (mcca.pm@gmail.com).

June 2017: MCCA Facebook

PLEASE NOTE: New, revamped Port Moody city website went live June 5, 2019.

It’s likely that ALL links provided on this MCCA site to city material were broken with the launch. We’ll endeavour to update links but it may take a bit of time and some may get missed.

Upcoming:

Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020, 7:00 pm: Council meetings; finance and committee of the whole. See below for link to agenda. Location is back in-person at city hall council chambers.

Note: Covid protocols are in place at city hall. For more info, click here.

Please note: Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) Annual General Meeting date to be determined.

For city updates on the coronavirus (COVID-19), closures, etc., visit city webpage here.

***********************************
See the city calendar link from city home web-page for more events, and the Tri-City News.

Various dates and events:  Port Moody Station Museum/Heritage Society.
Various dates and events: PoMo Arts Centre.

***********************************
Handy links:
Council webpage with livestream video link
Official Community Plan (OCP), adopted 2014/2015 (lawsuit delay)
Former OCP, adopted January 2011
Council’s Strategic Plan 2019-2022
Council’s Strategic Plan 2015-2018
Development applications (Port Moody), Excel format — Link changed, updated August 2019
Zoning map and related links
Zoning Bylaw
Moody Centre TOD, property owners consortium website (NEW, November 2019)
News portal, GVRD (Metro Vancouver)

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

2020-09-18: St George and Spring Streets — slow zone traffic changes

2020-09-18: St George and Spring Streets — slow zone traffic changes

On September 28, 2020, the City of Port Moody will introduce traffic calming measures on Spring Street and St. George Street to improve pedestrian, cyclist, and driver safety.

City webpage here.

St George Street

Spring Street

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2020-09-14: Westport Village status update (former Andres Wine site)

2020-09-14: Westport Village status update (former Andres Wine site)

Email update from Peller.

Dear friends,

From everyone at Andrew Peller Limited, we wish you all continued good health and good spirits during these times. Despite the new challenges our community has faced over the past six months, I’m pleased to be connecting again with you to provide an update on our Westport Village project.

Development Update at Westport
While our progress has indeed been slowed by the pandemic (as experienced in most aspects of life these days) we continue to take steps toward the eventual realization of Westport Village. At this time, we are actively exploring our options for a development partner who will assist us in finalizing development details and leading the construction and leasing phase of our project.

We stand firm in our view that it is important for us to partner with an organization who not only has proven success and expertise in real estate development, but also one who shares and believes in our vision for Westport Village.

We look forward to providing you with further updates on this front.

Andrew Peller in the Community
We continue to see ourselves very much as a part of the Port Moody community, and remain interested in supporting community programs and events. We recognize that a great number of the in-person events which we typically supported in years past have had to pivot or change delivery methods due to the pandemic this year. In spite of these challenges, we are pleased to have the opportunity for continued collaboration with some of our valued community organizations and partners this year again:

Port Moody Arts Centre – Art Centre Opening Gallery Receptions for 2020/2021
Tri Cities Chamber of Commerce – Business Excellence Awards Gala
Share Family Services Society – IMAGINE Gala – Paint the Night
Soroptimist Int. of Tri-Cities – Give Her Wings Gala
The Mary Anne Cooper – Port Moody Film Project
Port Moody Foundation – Tri-Cities COVID-19 Community Response Fund

I would like to reiterate our strong commitment to you and to the community of Port Moody in bringing Westport Village to life. Thank you for your continued interest and involvement in this exciting chapter of our history, we hope to be able to meet you all in person again shortly.

Sincerely,
John Peller
and the Westport Village Planning Team

Related:
July 23, 2019: Public hearing(s) for Westport Village, Porte Development, followed by regular council meeting

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

2020-09-15: St George slow zone, Elgin-Clarke light, St George dev’t proposal for 2500 block

2020-09-15: St George slow zone, Elgin-Clarke light, St George dev’t proposal for 2500 block

Council Committee of the Whole meeting, Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Quite a few items are on the agenda, as usual. For a look at the complete table of contents, with links to specific item attachments, click here.

Item 3.3, Funding Request – Installation of Pedestrian-Controlled Signal at Elgin and Clarke

Recommendation:
THAT $90,557 be allocated from the MTP Reserve and $236,285 be allocated from the DCC Reserve to fund the construction of a pedestrian-controlled signal at the intersection of Elgin Street and Clarke Street as recommended in the report dated August 26, 2020 from the Engineering and Operations Department – Project Delivery Services Division regarding Funding Request – Installation of Pedestrian-Controlled Signal at Elgin and Clarke.

MCCA note:
The Moody Centre Community Association has asked for a controlled signal at Elgin Street and St Johns Street, but no action has been taken. As St Johns Street is a major road through Port Moody, and there is a very long stretch with no lights – nothing in between Kyle and Barnet/Albert – it seems at least as important as a controlled light at Elgin and Clarke Streets.

The stretch from Kyle to Barnet/Albert is just shy of one kilometre (~900 metres). See image at top.

There is plenty of traffic and added density approved or under construction in the area.

Three lights have recently been added to the “Brewers Row” area on Murray Street in a stretch about one-third of the length of the no-light St Johns stretch.

Item 3.4, Slow zone (includes St George Street – Albert to Buller)

Below, from agenda material (link above)
Slow Zones:
Slow Zones are streets that are closed to allow local traffic only, or closed entirely to vehicle traffic if possible, to prioritize walking, cycling, and other active or neighbourhood uses. During the COVID-19 Pandemic, this can allow for access to outdoor space that is in high demand and provide more room for physical distancing. Ideally, these can be implemented in a simple and low cost manner by erecting a small number of signs and traffic barricades.

Staff recommend the following slow zone locations for implementation in the coming months:

 

Item 7.4, Early Input – OCP-Rezoning (Apartment) – 2505-2517 St. George Street (Laidler Development)

This area currently has four single-family homes, and is located just east of Kyle on the south side of St George Street. The applicant is proposing an OCP amendment and rezoning to construct a six-storey rental residential apartment building containing 148 units with a net Floor Area Ratio (FAR) of 2.82.

For more, see separate post  2020-09-15: Council early input – proposal for 6 storey apartment building on St George (Laidler).

There is much more on the agenda for council discussion that what we’ve highlighted here. We encourage people to click the link above for a list of all items and additional material.

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2020-09-15: UPDATED — Council early input — proposal for 6 storey apartment building on St George (Laidler)

2020-09-15: UPDATED — Council early input — proposal for 6 storey apartment building on St George (Laidler)

UPDATE

It was an unusual presentation to council on September 15, 2020 (early input). There was an introduction by city staff, followed by the applicant’s (Laidler) presentation. The second of two videos included renderings of a potentially re-done Kyle Centre which suggested if the project was allowed to proceed with additional density it would provide major (but unspecified) cash towards a new Kyle Centre. It was noted that more allowable density would result in more amenity cash.

It is important to note the land in question is not envisioned for density in the Official Community Plan (OCP), and is zoned RS1 (single-family low density).

The presentation also included a couple of property owners in the proposed parcel voicing support.

The council video from September 15 is here. This item, 7.4, starts with a staff presentation at just past 2:14 (2 hours, 14 minutes) into the recording.

The applicant’s pitch is primarily:

  • More rentals in Moody Centre would be beneficial.
  • 15% of the proposed units would be priced below market rate (unclear as to how much below).
  • The added density, if allowed, would be a net positive for affordability.
  • Community amenity contributions (CACs) would help to upgrade or rebuild Kyle Centre.

The applicant added a new twist — that the property at Mary and St George Streets (123-129 Mary St) consisting of 4 rental townhomes on one standard lot (RM4 zoning) — could be included in the proposal. The property has been for sale for just over two months for a price of $2,895,000. If this parcel was included the proposed building and footprint would become larger by one standard lot (5 in total).

This property is currently assessed at $2,295,000. Five years ago (2016) it was assessed at $1,390,000, about $900,000 less than today. See below for more source images, including BC Assessment and for sale listing.

The affordability debate

The Mary Street townhouses property is currently “affordable” rental by today’s standards, due to the fact it was built in 1969.

  • Based on the current asking price for the property, each square foot of residential building space is worth $387.
  • Based on the current assessed value, each square foot of residential building space is worth ~$307.
  • It is common to hear cost estimates of ~$1,000 per square foot for new builds.

Affordability comparison

Mary Street townhouses: With gross income of just under $80,000 per year divided by 4 (units), the unit rent works out to ~$20,000 per year, or ~$1,667 per month for a unit almost 1,900 sq. ft. with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, and fenced yard. This works out to about $0.88 (88 cents) per square foot per month.

As the Laidler proposal is for a rental building with 15% of the units below “market” rental, a question was asked about what rental rates might be. The applicant suggested a one-bedroom unit typically rents for about $1,900 per month. That works out to about $3.40 per square foot per month, or about $2.50 more than the current sq ft rental rate per month for the townhouses, or to put it another way almost a 4-fold increase (3.8). The applicant added they planned to rent for less than the typical number, but what that might be is unknown.

A recent article in The Tyee speaks to the issue of speculation and affordability. Here is an excerpt.

“You see, in Vancouver the real estate industry looks at housing cost from what might seem an odd perspective. They price units by the cost of land per square foot “buildable.” That means how many square feet of space you are allowed to build on a land parcel.

 So as you increase the allowable number of square feet you can build on that lot, you increase the price per square foot of dirt. If you double the “buildable” square feet of a parcel with a value of $2 million, its value jumps to close to $4 million overnight. And when that new housing is built, it has to sell at a price that pays off that steep rise in value — about $600 more per square foot.”

Source: Vancouver’s New Affordable Housing Plan Needs a Serious Tweak
It will accelerate land-price inflation, which drives our housing crisis. Here’s the math.
The Tyee, September 17, 2020, by Patrick Condon (James Taylor chair in Landscape and Livable Environments at UBC’s School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture and the founding chair of the UBC urban design program)

**********************************

This raises a lot of questions about the correlation between new development and affordability.

Is this something Port Moody should protect as currently zoned? Or approve it for redevelopment which would provide more units but result in a much higher rental cost per square foot.

***********************************

Below, information source images

Image from applicant presentation September 15, 2020

For sale listing

BC Assessment

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Original post

This proposal requires a significant OCP amendment to allow for 6 storeys on St George in a single-family low density neighbourhood (both OCP and zoning). Under the current OCP, up to 4 storeys are permitted on the main road of St Johns Street to the north.

This appears to be a potential land assembly if permissions can be obtained. BC Assessment shows no recent sales for any of the four properties in question.

Excerpts from agenda package below. For complete material, see agenda package at link here.

Purpose
To provide an opportunity for early Council input on the preliminary Official Community Plan (OCP) amendment and rezoning application submitted for 2505-2517 St. George Street for a six-storey multi-family residential building containing 148 units.

Background
The City has received a preliminary Official Community Plan (OCP) amendment and rezoning application for the properties at 2505-2517 St. George Street to amend the OCP from Single-Family Low Density to Multi-Family Residential and rezone the site from the Single Detached Residential (RS1) Zone to a Comprehensive Development (CD) Zone based on the Six-Storey Apartment Residential (RM8) Zone. The purpose of the OCP amendment and rezoning would be to facilitate the construction of a six-storey rental residential apartment building containing 148 units with a net Floor Area Ratio (FAR) of 2.82.

MCCA note: The RM8 zoning is a bit of a mystery. It does not appear on the current city zoning map, link here for map and bylaw links.

Discussion
Property Description:
The subject site consists of four single-family lots totaling approximately 3,040m2 (0.75ac). Each of the single-family lots are currently developed with a single-family home. The property also has sloping characteristics as it slopes upwards from north to south with an elevation change of approximately three to four metres.

Proposal
The pre-application proposes to amend the OCP from Single-Family Low Density to Multi-Family and rezone the subject site from the RS1 Zone to a CD Zone to allow for a six-storey apartment. The development would consist of a total of 148 residential rental units over an underground parkade with the following unit mix:

At this time, staff are seeking input from the Committee of the Whole. While the proposed recommendation provides for general input through the Council discussion, the Committee could choose to provide more specific direction to the applicant and staff through an alternative resolution. One alternative resolution is as follows:

THAT the applicant be advised to revise the current preliminary application for 2505-2517 St. George (Laidler Development) with the goal of achieving consistency with current Official Community Plan policies.

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

2020-08: August notes and news links — Covid, developments, cafe, mural, urban food, smelly air …

2020-08: August notes and news links — Covid, developments, cafe, mural, urban food, smelly air …

It’s been an unusual summer with Covid hanging over our heads. Getting out closer to home, observing safety protocols, and none of the usual summer events. We hope people had a good summer overall regardless of the strange situation we find ourselves in!

City facilities are slowly re-opening. We have a link at the top of this site to city Covid updates.

Post August break, Port Moody council and committees are re-starting. For the schedule of meetings and agendas, see the calendar here. Next council meeting is Tuesday, September 8, 2020.

The owners of the Flavelle mill site just west of Rocky Point Park have announced the mill will close by the end of October. We’re not sure what comes next. The Flavelle Oceanfront Development website no longer exists. See recent post: 2020-08-31: Flavelle mill to close, future of site uncertain.

Two other very large development proposals have submitted their applications:

On July 28, 2020, Port Moody resident Haven Lurbieki made a presentation to council, in which she asked council for improvements to the city’s current development applications spreadsheet. Council agreed. See recent post: 2020-08-21: Tracking development in Port Moody.

On August 29, 2020, the Tri-City News reported on climate change hazards in Port Moody. See recent post: 2020-08-29: Climate change hazards in Port Moody, Tri-Cities.

Additional recent MCCA post: 2020-09-01: Upcoming OCP review, Murray Street presentation from past

A sampling of other stories in the news:

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2020-08-31: Flavelle mill to close, future of site uncertain — UPDATED

2020-08-31: Flavelle mill to close, future of site uncertain — UPDATED

The Flavelle mill site just west of Rocky Point Park has announced plans to close down operations by the end of October.

Flavelle sawmill on historic Port Moody site to be shuttered by end of October, Vancouver Sun, August 26, 2020

Unknown: what comes next?

In July 2017, following a public hearing, council of the day approved a vision for “Flavelle Oceanfront Development.”

Flavelle Public Hearing (“Oceanfront”)

In May 2018, the Metro Vancouver Regional Board of Directors agreed to the city’s request to change the area’s designation from “industrial, special study area” to “general urban.”

Flavelle Oceanfront Development, official change from “industrial, special study area” to “general urban”

Since then, nothing has happened to change the site use, and the mill has continued to operate, while the land assessment value has risen sharply.

In October 2018, the provincial government passed Bill 42 to lessen the tax burden for operating industrial sites and this bill applied to the Flavelle site (although taxes are high generally). It’s not clear whether shuttering mill operations means the property will then be taxed at it’s “highest and best use” in consideration of the application for development for Flavelle Oceanfront Development.

The Flavelle Oceanfront Development website has vanished and in its place is: http://aspenenterprises.ca/projects/

There are many outstanding questions right now.

  • Will there be a development application?
  • Will the site revert to its industrial designation?
  • How will taxes be determined?
  • Will the site be sold?

There is much more background information on this site. Interested readers can use the search bar and terms Flavelle, Mill and Timber, Oceanfront, etc.

One of the more comprehensive background pieces is this:

Flavelle Oceanfront Development — open house, part two

UPDATE:
Al Bieksa, a spokesperson for the union members working at Flavelle has provided some perspective from the union point of view and experience.

Read the union web blog post here: Another one bites the dust.

Mr. Bieksa refers to an estimated property value of $150M. BC Assessment indicates the land value at about $50M; however, the value of $150M represents a higher potential based on a change in land use. With the shuttering of the mill, unless there is an OCP change such as reverting to industrial on the OCP map, the tax relief provided by the province’s Bill 42 for active industrial properties will no longer apply.

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2020-09-01: Upcoming OCP review, Murray Street presentation from past

2020-09-01: Upcoming OCP review, Murray Street presentation from past

Murray Street is on the OCP map as Mixed Employment as shown below.

Murray Street (Area D) is included in the upcoming OCP review.

The area — opposite Rocky Point Park — is currently mostly light industrial but applications have come in such as the Mosaic proposal, primarily residential units. The Moody Centre TOD consortium (Area F) is also proposing to expand into Murray Street just north of the train tracks.

Some of the existing buildings are now part of Port Moody’s “Brewers Row.”

About a decade ago, the “Port Moody Waterfront Community Interest Group” prepared a conceptual presentation, and the YouTube link is below. It may help to re-invigorate the conversation on what people might like to see on Murray Street.

Murray Street Boulevard presentation (YouTube)

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2020-08-31: Coronation Park, Wesgroup pressing forward with proposal

2020-08-31: Coronation Park, Wesgroup pressing forward with proposal

Now seen in Coronation Park

 

Wesgroup has now filed its formal application to the city of Port Moody, with asks for major OCP amendments, including:

  • a proposed Floor Area Ratio (FAR) of 4.4, or 226,910m² (2,442,446ft²), accommodating approximately 2,800 residential units and 1,114m² (12,000ft²) of neighbourhood serving commercial;
  • a built form including six high-rise towers of in the range of 32-36 storeys, each with a six-storey podium and five low-rise buildings of six storeys;

The area currently has 59 single-family homes, two of which are not included in the land assembly as shown above.

That’s about 50 units per every existing home, quite a big change, potentially.

No formal dates for discussion and public input have yet been announced.

Most recent MCCA post on this:

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2020-08-29: Climate change hazards in Port Moody, Tri-Cities

2020-08-29: Climate change hazards in Port Moody, Tri-Cities

Below, projections of flooding danger due to climate change. The darker the colour the higher the risk.

 

Health authorities pinpoint climate change hazards in Tri-Cities (MAP)
Health authorities from across the Lower Mainland team up with UBC researchers to identify neighbourhoods at particular risk to flooding, extreme heat and air pollution.
Tri-City News, August 29, 2020

“FLOODING

Finally, in what often produces the most violent effects of extreme weather, climate change-induced flooding scenarios across the Lower Mainland show very high levels of vulnerabilities across large areas of the Tri-Cities.

In Port Moody, the entire coastline reaches the “very high vulnerability” threshold, only dipping to “high” in surrounding neighbourhoods. Coquitlam’s Maillardville, a curled swath of land around Mary Hill as well as several neighbourhoods east of Birchland Manor and north of Oxford Heights also show very high levels of flood vulnerability.”

Click on article title link above for full story.

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

2020-08-21: Tracking development in Port Moody

2020-08-21: Tracking development in Port Moody

Sample image from spreadsheet (see link below)

50,000

The city of Port Moody’s official population target up to the year 2041 (about two decades) is 50,000. This number has been questioned as the number of development applications — including some major ones which if approved may take awhile for build-out — keep coming at a rapid pace.

On July 28, 2020, Port Moody resident Haven Lurbieki made a presentation to council (link here), in which she asked council for improvements to the city’s current development applications spreadsheet (click here to access spreadsheet). We agree with her ask for improvements.

Council also agreed an improved format would be very helpful.

Below, example of how the city currently provides a summary of development applications information. Click on image to enlarge.

Ideas/Brainstorming

We took a brainstorming stab at envisioning a spreadsheet that provides additional information in a more flexible format including sorting and filtering capabilities. See image at top of this post, and below for spreadsheet link.

We note that CPAC member Patricia Bryant Mace and admin of the Port Moody Growth/Development Discussion Group (Facebook group) has also provided an excellent snapshot on growth and numbers. For anyone who uses Facebook, you can access the recent post here.

With permission, below is an image of the initial snapshot from the Facebook group post.

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) spreadsheet/snapshot below is a working draft subject to new ideas and changes, and does not have complete information, but as above is also intended to move the issue forward. It’s essentially a raw data workbook idea, NOT an attempt to be inclusive and fill in all missing information.

The numbers will not stay static.

Some projects may not go ahead, new ones will appear, and some may be adjusted. These are estimates with information currently available. It’s hard to estimate the number of people per units, for example, as it will vary with unit size, affordability, and so on. Existing information sources are inconsistent.

We believe decision-making can be improved with enhanced tools. Better data should translate into more informed decisions.

To view, click on link below.
2020-devt apps spreadsheet-ideas draft

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Foreshadowing the here and now

From January 2014

“There was also discussion on how the city would measure growth and stay on track with its goals.  Base density maps were proposed but the motion did not pass.

Most council members appear to have confidence in the ability of current and future councils to monitor growth – without the need for measurement tools such as base density maps.  [Note:  unlike previous OCPs, this plan has also removed planning tools such as how many units per acre are allowed, ground site coverage, and more.]”

See: OCP – Still a Pandora’s Box of unknown outcomes

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment