Welcome to the Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) website

MCCA-welcome

Adopt-a-street: MCCA adopted the street area of Queens Street Plaza early in 2015, and teams meet periodically to clean the area with equipment provided by the city. If you can spare an occasional hour or so to help, please email us at mcca.pm@gmail.com, and we’ll add you to our list. This would not commit you to a set schedule, but more people willing to pitch in once in awhile will help us to keep the area clean. It’s not just cleaning — it’s interaction and community building!

MCCA Membership:  We welcome new (and lapsed) members at any time.  Must be 19+ and reside in the Moody Centre catchment area (see map).  Annual fee is $5/year. Payment can be made at any event, or by contacting MCCA to arrange (mcca.pm@gmail.com).

June 2017: MCCA Facebook

PLEASE NOTE: New, revamped Port Moody city website went live June 5, 2019.

It’s likely that ALL links provided on this MCCA site to city material were broken with the launch. We’ll endeavour to update links but it may take a bit of time and some may get missed.

Upcoming:

Starting July 7, 2019: Summer Sundays (music at Rocky Point Park). More info here: summersundays.ca.

Sat., August 10, 2019, 12:00-6:00 pm: Burrard Inlet Fish Fest at Rocky Point Park. More info here (city webpage) or here (BIFF site).

Sun., August 18, 2019, 12:00-7:00 pm: Car-free Day on St Johns Street. More info here.

Sat., Aug. 31, 2019, after sunset at Rocky Point Park: Movie Captain Marvel, sponsored by Panatch Group. No charge.

—Gatensbury Road Closure, Road Improvement Project:  COMPLETED.

***********************************
See the city calendar link from city home web-page for more events, and the Tri-City News.

Various dates and events:  Port Moody Station Museum/Heritage Society.
Various dates and events: PoMo Arts Centre.

***********************************
Handy links:
Council webpage with livestream video link
Council meeting video recordings (since September 2012)
2019 Council Agendas and Minutes
2018 Council Agendas and Minutes
Committee Agendas and Minutes, multiple years (links)
Council Agendas and Minutes, multiple years (links)
Official Community Plan (OCP), adopted 2014/2015 (lawsuit delay)
Former OCP, adopted January 2011
Council’s Strategic Plan 2015-2018
Development applications (Port Moody), Excel format — Link changed, updated August 2019
Zoning Bylaw (NEW)
News portal, GVRD (Metro Vancouver)

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

“Outta here” Around my house consignment shop on St Johns

“Outta here” Around my house consignment shop on St Johns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sorry to see you go.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Moody Centre TOD recent sales activity

Moody Centre TOD recent sales activity

Recent real estate activity begs the question of whether any sort of “consortium” plans mean much at this stage. We see these recent property acquisitions, and land for sale (below), along with the four properties ($29M) sold to Kwikletlem First Nations (KFN) starting in October 2017, then flipped within a day to Beedie Developments. It’s interesting to note that at the November 28, 2017 public hearing on Moody Centre TOD, then KFN Chief Giesbrecht (not re-elected) spoke about wanting to build rental housing. Was that just a public relations manipulation tactic? As far as we know, the KFN no longer owns land in this area. (See Moody Centre TOD update, post public hearing for more; also more recently Moody Centre TOD mystery: What’s the plan?)

3006 Spring Street
57,000 sq. ft.
Sold: June 14, 2019 for ~$18M ($17,712,000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3060 Spring Street
25,087 sq. ft.
Sold: June 14, 2019 for ~$9M ($8,856,000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For Sale > Moody Centre Station High-Rise Site
3044-3078 St. Johns Street, Port Moody

Link for more information and video here.

For lease
3020 Spring Street

Likely one of the properties Beedie purchased in the one-day flip from Kwikletlem First Nations. Reference: Vancouver Sun, June 14, 2019, Sold on your behalf: 164 B.C. schools and hospitals, agricultural and industrial lots worth $1 billion.

For sale, 84 Moody Street
BC assessment, current: $2,516,200
Prior year assessment: $2,019,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related:
The “consortium” of property owners for the Moody Centre TOD area have not yet provided for any public engagement. As any proposals could be a long way from actual development, it seems some space may be made available for temporary artist studios.

Tri-City News, August 7, 2019
Dozens of art studios for Moody Centre?
Port Moody’s arts, culture committee backing proposal for temporary artist studios

“We know in the City of the Arts that we have many, many dozens of people looking for space and potentially, in the Tri-Cities, it’s hundreds,” she told The Tri-City News last Tuesday, noting committee members are enthused by the idea and “very much on board.”

The concept, which will likely come before council next month for consideration, involves temporary artist studios at four Spring Street locations that are poised for redevelopment in the next 18 to 24 months.

All are zoned M1 (light industrial) and range in size from 4,200 sq. ft. to 10,000 sq. ft.:

  • 3006 Spring St., Unit C (4,200 sq. ft., mezzanine with a front loading bay);
  • 3008 Spring St. (5,500 sf. ft., with office space, a front loading bay and potential display space at front);
  • 3020 Spring St. (8,000 to 10,000 sq. ft., mezzanine with loading at back);
  • and 3088 Spring St. (eight units on second floor).

None of the property owners is named in the committee document and city officials declined to respond to requests for comment, saying the proposal is in its early stages.”

Click on article title above for full story.

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sad — businesses, residents, heritage buildings, major fire damage in old Port Moody

Sad — businesses, residents, heritage buildings, major fire damage in old Port Moody

On July 28, 2019, a fire ravaged parts of the 2400 block of historic Clarke Street. Devastating for businesses, and a few residents living in upstairs units. Cause as yet unknown. Other than the inactive grocery store, it appears the Gallery Bistro had the most damage. Also affected is the Silk Gallery/CityState Consulting and a new chocolate shop; hopefully they can recover.

While this is a very sad event, the Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) is grateful there were no serious injuries to the people involved. Thanks to our first responders who worked long and hard to put the fire out and keep people safe, and to a few residents who did what they could to assist.

Some photos

Photo above from: Fire in Port Moody destroys historic downtown strip of buildings, The Province, July 29, 2019

Queen Street looking from St Johns to Clarke, July 29, 2019

 

Former grocery store

 

Sinkhole/watermain repair on Clarke Street, July 29, 2019

 

No vehicles on Clarke Street, July 29, 2019, a strange sight

 

Local report:
Devastating fire in Port Moody’s historic core sends businesses scrambling, Tri-City News, July 29, 2019

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Moody Centre TOD mystery: What’s the plan?

Moody Centre TOD mystery: What’s the plan?

Follow-up to Balanced community: “More than a Bedroom Community! Building a Tech & Innovation Hub” — Updated (July 2019) and council meetings July 16 and July 23, 2019.

See questions below, near end.

Below, left, Colliers Canada property sale marketing, conceptual rendering, portion of area in question.

Long designated a commercial/industrial area, what will this Moody Centre TOD area become? (TOD is short-form for transit-oriented development.)

In 5 short years (2012-2017), Official Community Plan (OCP) visions have gone from up to 4-storey buildings to 26 (though it’s possible we’ll see asks for up to 40 storeys; see scenarios below). We don’t know because we have just been made aware that landowners/developers (the “consortium”) have been working with city staff for at least 18 months, and probably longer, under the radar — not a speck of public engagement or communication.

While the public was told on July 16, 2019 that the consortium and city staff have been working on plans behind the scenes, the last public engagement was at a contentious OCP amendment hearing on November 28, 2017.

On July 16th, Acting Mayor Hunter Madsen presented a report and recommendations to press for a primary focus on employment-oriented development — a concept discussed for many years but which appears to have become of secondary importance. The Madsen report was deferred until council could meet at a workshop planned for August 6, 2019 to further review material city planners and the consortium had worked on. From comment July 16th, it appears most councillors have had at least a recent “glimpse” of the mysterious proposal. Councillor Royer commented that highrise residential has better profit margins than buildings for other types of use.

One week later on July 23, 2019, before the upcoming workshop, the Madsen report was brought back for reconsideration and was defeated (councillors Dilworth, Lahti, Royer).

‘Urgent’ Port Moody plan that was deferred is now defeated, Tri-City News, July 24, 2019

Several members of the consortium were at the July 16th meeting to advocate for their interests and were concerned about the Madsen report. Some of those people are marketing their properties for sale (see Colliers Canada link and image above); some have purchased land more recently, including the Beedie Group who reportedly purchased from the Kwikletlem First Nations in a one day flip according to the Vancouver Sun, June 14, 2019, Sold on your behalf: 164 B.C. schools and hospitals, agricultural and industrial lots worth $1 billion.

About 20 acres
Note, the city-produced images below are to demonstrate a sense of options and density. They do not show the Evergreen Skytrain line on the property, and don’t adhere to OCP policy in terms of set-backs, “stepping down” and more.

Density comparison

At the November 27, 2017 public hearing to amend the criteria for this area, landowners/developers were out in full force to advocate for the highest density possible, such as Scenario C.

Council settled on Scenario A, but these “visions” are frequently changed. For example, the Marcon George project on St George Street, a couple of blocks south of the “Moody Centre TOD” area, asked for 6-storey condo buildings in place of the 3-storey limit in the OCP. Their request was granted, and the build currently in progress replaces 22 single-family lots with 252 new townhouse and condo units. And, of course, there have been many other amendments to the OCP which allow for higher density. (Side-note: projects in progress may not have contributed to community amenities (CACs or DCCs, Development Cost Charges) to the extent that will be required in future, resulting in subsidization from general taxation.)


Partial additional reference:

Questions

  • How long has the consortium been meeting with city planning staff?
  • How long has the consortium been meeting with any members of council (current or former)?
  • How much time has been spent developing a draft proposal?
  • What has been the dollar cost ($) to the city to this point; e.g., staff time, materials?
  • On what authority did this behind closed doors planning proceed?
  • If council gave direction to staff to work on an area proposal as referred to in July 2019 council meetings, when did this happen? Specifics?
  • Why has there been no involvement or presentation to the Community Planning Advisory Group (CPAC)?
  • Why has there been no public engagement?
  • When will the draft plans be made available to the public?
  • Has the city given thought to the uncertainty and likely displacement of business tenants?
  • What power does the general public have, if any?
  • What is the plan?

Comparison

  • Cambie corridor, south Vancouver, 25 acres of public land sold to Onni, 2015/2016, “21 multi-storey buildings, including homes for 4,500 people — the equivalent of nearly every resident of Osoyoos moving onto this 25-acre site.” Source: Vancouver Sun, The story behind the government’s largest sale of ‘surplus’ land: Did taxpayers get a good deal?
  • The Cambie corridor noted above is about 5 acres greater in size than Moody Centre TOD, with a projected population of just under that in “Scenario C” in chart above. The Cambie corridor concept is considered very dense, and is in an area with more routes in and out than Moody Centre.
  • Moody Centre TOD area includes the Skytrain station and parking.

Additional reference

 

 

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

July 23, 2019: Public hearing(s) for Westport Village, Porte Development, followed by regular council meeting

July 23, 2019: Public hearing(s) for Westport Village, Porte Development, followed by regular council meeting

Public hearing(s) start at 7:00 pm, council chambers (live-streamed). Agenda material here.

Related:

***********************************

Regular council meeting starts at the conclusion of 7:00 pm public hearing(s), council chambers (live-streamed).

Complete council agenda can be accessed from city webpage here.

Please note public input is allowed, in-person at meetings and/or by written submission to council@portmoody.ca and/or clerks@portmoody.ca. Written submissions are not currently recorded in official minutes. Written submissions for public hearings should be received by the city by 12:00 noon latest on the day of the meeting.

Regular Council meeting, table of contents

For more information on any of the above topics, use the link provided above.

Item 7.1, 3227-3239 St Johns Street, refers to the Porte Development proposal. It follows the public hearing(s) which begin at 7:00 pm. Use link above for more. Most recent MCCA post: May 6, 2019: Development proposal open house — Porte Communities.

Item 7.2, Westport Village, refers to the Andres Wines property at Barnet and Clarke, west end of Moody Centre. It follows the public hearing(s) which begin at 7:00 pm. Use link above for more. Most recent MCCA post: Westport proposed major development seeking approval to amend OCP and zoning bylaw.

Item 9.8, refers to the Forte Living proposal for a six-storey mixed-use commercial/residential project. If approved, it is schedule for a public hearing on September 10, 2019. Most recent MCCA post: Open house, development proposal, 3105-3113 St Johns at Buller, Forte Living.

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Balanced community: “More than a Bedroom Community! Building a Tech & Innovation Hub” — Updated

Balanced community: “More than a Bedroom Community! Building a Tech & Innovation Hub” — Updated

Update: A few news links, and city reply to a Freedom of Information Request.

City reply to Freedom of Information request

The FOI request was to do with potential future infrastructure. We hope further information will be made available soon, but below is what we currently have (from January 2015 to January 2019). Based on the amount of redactions it’s difficult to form an opinion.

From cover letter, reasons for redaction:
“The records you requested contain information that cannot be disclosed under sections 12, 17, and 22 of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (the Act). I have severed the portions of the records that cannot be disclosed so that we are able to disclose to you the remaining information in the records. The severed portions cannot be disclosed as they contain information regarding the substance of deliberations of meetings that were authorized to be held in the absence of the public; information about negotiations; and personal information, the disclosure of which would be an unreasonable invasion of a third party’s personal privacy if released.”

Release of information, material UP TO January 2019, not covering more recent months:

Sample from PDF, page 36 (click on PDF link below for entire document).


2019-FOI reply-Moody Centre-Severed documents (complete PDF document)

Part of the Moody Centre area in question is listed for sale by Colliers Canada.

***********************************

Report to council, July 16, 2019 meeting, full report available here.

MCCA recommends review of the full document.

The meeting on July 16, 2019 starts at 7:00 pm, and there is a public input opportunity at the beginning of the meeting.

Conceptual image

 

Councillor (and current acting mayor) Hunter Madsen has prepared a report to council asking “Which Destiny for Port Moody?” in which he makes the case for preferring a tech and innovation hub with quality employment opportunities in Moody Centre, in contrast to an area “dominated primarily by residential condo towers that offer only a smattering of office space, light industry, and retail shops around their base podiums.”

Page 14 of report:

Page 4 of report:
“Becoming just a bedroom community escalates homeowner tax burden. Bedroom communities burden their residents with rapidly escalating property taxes, because there isn’t enough vigorous, diverse local business to share the tax burden. Such communities must somehow provide all the essential services and amenities – parks, playgrounds, libraries, rec centers, seniors assistance, etc. – that growing residential populations demand, but are forced to fund these things disproportionately through heavy residential property taxes and usage fees. (In contrast, the neighbouring cities where commuters go to work and spend their daytime cash usually generate lots of business tax revenue that helps to underwrite the ample amenities of residents living in those locations.)”

***********************************

This is not a new idea.

Discussions about quality employment in Moody Centre started in earnest years ago, but so far have continued to be de-railed.

The oft-heard phrase, a community in which to “live, work, and play” (used in the city’s Official Community Plan, and supporting plans) is not measuring up in terms of the “work” part of a balanced community.

In the past year, Port Moody hired an Economic Development Manager to explore opportunities, and the city’s Economic Development Committee has held discussions on generating employment-based development.

High-tech hub, 2009-

Former councillor Gerry Nuttall (and Freedom of the City recipient) worked on this concept (starting about 10 years ago).

 

Online, Tri-City News: Port Moody investigating high-tech park potential

What happened?

Property owners in the Moody Centre TOD area should be well aware of the promotion of a technology/business hub that began many years ago.

Roundtable discussions in 2015: employment focused development

In early March 2015, the city hosted roundtable discussions with “senior members of the real estate development and brokerage community in Metro Vancouver … to offer their views on Port Moody’s competiveness in attracting development, especially employment-generating.” A report was presented to council in June 2015: Facilitating Employment-Based Development in Port Moody.

Some members of council felt the roundtable discussions could have been improved by inviting input from a broader group, such as reps from organizations that provide good quality employment. The report seemed to focus more on high-density residential development than it did on creating employment-related development.

It was agreed more work on Facilitating Employment-Based Development was necessary.

Official Community Plan (OCP), issues on employment numbers, 2015

Council adopted the current OCP in October 2014; however, Metro Vancouver (regional district) declared the OCP invalid and proceeded with a lawsuit against the city of Port Moody.  There were several issues; one of them was employment numbers not aligning with the Regional Context Statement (RCS).

Metro Vancouver sent a letter dated March 10, 2015 to Port Moody outlining three outstanding issues.

“First, Metro 2040 projects employment for Port Moody to increase from 8,000 in 2006 to 18,000 in 2041, while the proposed RCS notes that employment will increase to 8,373 in 2021 and 9,573 in 2041. The RCS projections must be deemed ‘generally consistent’ with the regional projections, and this difference is quite significant.”

At council’s subsequent meeting on March 24, 2015, on-table items included revised employment projections, in which the Port Moody numbers were bumped up, and the Metro Vancouver/GVRD numbers were bumped down, apparently with the co-operation of MetroVan, as the “city is working towards goals” and moving in the right direction.

Port Moody employment numbers for 2041 were bumped up by about 2,000 (from 9,573 to 11,527), and the MetroVan numbers were bumped down by about 3,000 (settling at 15,000).

The discrepancy is still considerable, at about 3,500, but without the bumping up and down from the two stakeholders, it would have been much greater at about 8,500.

***********************************

There is plenty of additional information on this site.

This is an important discussion that can guide Port Moody’s way forward with employment-focused development (or not).

We encourage residents to consider providing their input to council.

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

July 9, 2019: council meeting — Woodlands, Westport Village, more

July 9, 2019: council meeting — Woodlands, Westport Village, more

Regular council meeting starts at 7:00 pm, council chambers (live-streamed).

Complete agenda can be accessed from city webpage here.

Please note public input is allowed, in-person at meetings and/or by written submission to council@portmoody.ca and/or clerks@portmoody.ca. Written submissions are not currently recorded in official minutes. Written submissions for public hearings should be received by the city by 12:00 noon latest on the day of the meeting.

***********************************

Regular Council meeting, table of contents

For more information on any of the above topics, use the link provided above.

Item 9.1, is to do with the Woodland Park area, redevelopment expected in future. See Woodland Park — Invitation for community information meeting, July 11, 2019.

Item 9.4, Westport Village, refers to the Andres Wines property at Barnet and Clarke, west end of Moody Centre. It’s expected this development application will go to a Public Hearing to be held on Tuesday, July 23, 2019.  The proposal is substantial, proposing a variety of uses. Use link above for more. Most recent MCCA post: Westport proposed major development seeking approval to amend OCP and zoning bylaw.

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) welcomes your comments.

***********************************

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment